(Closed) “Unfixed” Dog + Jealousy?

posted 9 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
545 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

your dog seems like the “alpha dog”. she is the only dog so she is dominant in your household

I think if you got another dog you would need to find a bit of a more submissive dog

cesar milan can figure it out. My two dogs are similar.. my little maltese is carefree and not alpha-y at all but my beagle is major alpha dog so they do well together.

Post # 4
Member
6597 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

She is dominating you and Shadow!

Dogs need strong pack leaders in order to be submissive and well behaved. Your dog trying to mount the other dog, trying to control the other dog, jealousy of you petting the other dog and forcing you to do something by pawing you are all signs of dominance.

Dominance decreases when dogs get spayed or neutered; however, it will not totally go away unless there is some proper training and all owners become pack leaders in the household.

I don’t know why your shelter wouldn’t let you adopt another dog without Lady being spayed – did you ask them their reasons?

Post # 5
Member
545 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

YAY Mrs. Martin!! Pack Leader is what cesar milan is all about..

Post # 6
Member
6597 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Love cesar!!!!!

Post # 8
Member
6597 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

I can understand that they would be against breeding (there are two many unwanted dogs out there already) but if you were to get another female or a fixed male that wouldn’t necessarily be a problem.

I would call them and ask!

Post # 9
Member
806 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I volunteer at a shelter and we would also not adopt out to people whose current pets weren’t fixed.  The reason being that one of the main philosophies/mission of the shelter is to reduce the number of homeless pets and by not fixing/spaying you risk your pet making unwanted babies.  (Even if you have 2 unfixed females in the house, they could still get preg by another dog while outside or something).  The assumption may be if you didn’t get your current pet fixed, you wouldn’t fix your new dog either, and they would prefer to find the dog a home where it will be fixed.  Just a thought but you may want to ask the shelter.

Post # 10
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

YES.  Being fixed often DRAMATICALLY reduces these aggressive tendencies, in ALL species of animals!  I’ve definitely observed this in my own pets (I’ve  had many).  Beyond that, getting your pet spayed or neutered is just the resposnisble thing to do.  Every year, millions of dogs have to be killed because there are simply too many in our shelters and streets (I say this as someone who worked in a shelter for years and saw it firsthand).  An unneutered dog only needs to escape your house for five minutes to either get pregnant or impregnate another dog and thus contribute to this overpopulation epidemic.  This is a totally ‘legit’ reason.

In short, those shelter workers have reason to be concerned.  Please do schedule your dog an appointment to be ‘fixed’!  She’ll be more emotionally balanced, especially around other dogs, and there’s no chance of her getting pregnant should she ever escape your house.  These surgeries can cost as little as $20 or even be free in some areas, and your dog will be in pain for only a few days and will love you no less.  Yes, she may be an ‘alpha’ dog, but most dogs will work out their dominance issues and grow to work well together in a ‘pack’ (again, I’ve seen this with the many dogs we’ve had).  In any event, after you’ve gotten your dog fixed and when you plan to get another dog, you should always take your current dog to meet your potential new dog at the shelter before adopting.  That’ll let you know how much their personalities will collide and if bringing the new dog home could be a disaster.

Post # 11
Member
1051 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

All shelters are pro-neutering to decrease the pet overpopulation problem.  All shelter animals are fixed before being sent home (or some will be sent home but with the contract stating the animal must be neutered when age-appropriate or the animal returned)

With Lady not spayed, your 2-dog home could very well be a 10-dog home in the future, a situation not too many shelters would support.  A lot of shelters consider it irresponsible to have an unaltered pet – those unwanted babies are the very ones they’re constantly taking in, trying to find homes and unfortunately often having to put down.

Just curious, is there a reason you haven’t gotten her spayed?

Post # 13
Member
464 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I agree with other posters regarding having a spayed or neutered animal in the home. First, shelters are very “pro-fixing,” and this is a legitimate reason. Second, for another “legit” reason, unspayed females do tend to be territorial. So they may be afraid that, in addition to not promoting their mission and (potentially) contributing to pet overpopulation, your dog may cause problems by being so territorial.

Spaying female dogs is beneficial to them on a number of levels. In addition to behavioral benefits seen in some dogs, and to the benefit of knowing that you’re not contributing to the tragedy that is pet overpopulation, it also greatly reduces their chance of developing mammary cancer (the most common cancer in dogs) and pyometra (a painful and potentially deadly infection of the uterus, which becomes more common as dogs age).

That said, spaying a dog will not immediately change her territorial behaviors, especially once they’re already ingrained. You’d need to train her to help with that. It sounds like Lady might prefer to be an only-dog, but you could try training her to be calm around other dogs. Start with low-level stuff and give her lots of rewards for being calm around other dogs (maybe you could start with giving her dog treats and praise with your mom’s dog in another room; and when Lady can be calm for that, slowly move your mom’s dog closer until you can get to the point where Lady is comfortable with you petting your mom’s dog). Time consuming, but worth it if it works and makes you and Lady happier! You could also try browsing the information on this site, to see if any of the articles are helpful. Dr. Sophia Yin is a veterinarian and a behaviorist, so she knows her stuff!

Post # 14
Member
2143 posts
Buzzing bee

@Akennedy- a couple others have hit the nail on the head as to why they won’t adopt a dog out to someone who hasnt had their other dog fixed. It is their mission to help find homes and decrease the many unwanted pets which means they fully believe in spaying and neutering all dogs and cats. Even if they did adopt out a female so there was no way pups could be conceived, it’s just against their “morals.” Hubby works in an animal shelter and you wouldn’t believe how worked up he gets about unaltered animals! As you said, your Fiance MIGHT want her to have puppies down the line, and there is just NO WAY a shelter is going to let a dog go into someone’s hands who believes that would be ok (I agree and would say “wtf” if he said maybe she wants to have puppies. it’s not like people where their thoughts guide them- it’s purely hormonal!). Maybe a city shelter would let a dog be adopted out, but not a no kill. If there were some sort of medical reason why the dog couldn’t be fixed they might grant some leway, but not when they have no reason other than maybe wanting puppies one day.

Post # 15
Member
7081 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Both of my Berners have been unfixed show dogs, and neither has ever exhibited a single aggressive tendency.  However we have pretty strict dog rules in our house and had extensive early socialization…  We go over the top to be responsible about our dogs and reproduction.  If they are not finished breeding stock they will get spayed or neutered.  We’ve *never* had a puppy accident, but our dogs are always leashed and watched.

It’s not always about spaying and neutering.  Sometimes it can be a personality, temperment or training issue.

Post # 16
Member
464 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

If your SO is very against your dog being spayed, you might want to point out to him the health benefits. Mammary (or breast) cancer is the one of the most common cancers in dogs, and the chances of having malignant mammary tumors gets higher and higher the more years the dog is unspayed. A dog spayed before the first “heat” cycle basically eliminates its chances of developing this cancer, being spayed after 2 heat cycles makes the chances of developing cancer to 1 in 4 (about 1 in 4 unspayed females will go on to develop cancer). Chances go up from there. However, this is NOT to say that a dog will definitely develop cancer- it just becomes more likely. It also does NOT mean that spaying later in life is useless. Exposure to estrogen is what makes the tumors more likely (so # of pregnancies can also effect the chances of developing cancer), and dogs don’t go through menopause, so spaying at any age is beneficial and decreases cancer chances. As a female dog ages, she also becomes more prone to developing pyometra, an infection of the uterus (I’ll spare you the icky details). Many people don’t realize it, but “fixed” dogs tend to live longer, healthier, lives.

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