(Closed) Unplugged Wedding

posted 6 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
6015 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: March 2012

My big problem with the “unplugged” wedding is… if I’m a guest and you’re not giving me a picture of your wedding as a gift … .how do I have a picture of the event.

Post # 4
Member
44 posts
Newbee

Im sorry but can you please tell me what that means? I have never heard of an unplugged wedding??

Post # 5
Member
3668 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

I get why people want unplugged weddings (guests are more present, not getting in the photographers’ way, etc.), but I would be BEYOND pissed if my cell phone was confiscated at the door.

Post # 6
Member
4194 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - Baltimore Museum of Industry

At our wedding, and the one we just went last week, the officiant asked guests to check the ringers on their cell phones. 

I wouldn’t keep people from taking photos- your photographer can’t get everything. 

Post # 7
Member
2488 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@selinak2007:  unplugged means no electronics from guests. it mostly applys to them taking pictures so that you don’t have guests on phones in pictures. steping into the asile to get shots etc.

Post # 8
Member
2488 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I’m just asking people not to take pictures during the ceremony but begging to take them after the ring change so first kiss and when it all gets exciting please whip those cameras out!

Post # 9
Member
7749 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

There was a post a few weeks ago. It wasn’t an unplugged wedding, rather, the poster was a Bridesmaid or Best Man and her daughter was a Girlfriend so she had no time to take photos. She was expected to pay $20 per print for any pro photos.

So… will your guests get free wedding photos.?

I think it’s ok to ask guests to refrain from posting photos of the bride and groom to facebook for a few weeks. I don’t think it’s ok to stop them taking photos. Besides, I love the clicking of camerea during the first kiss.

Post # 11
Member
5547 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

I think it is totally fine to make a reminder in the cermony to please not take pictures so the flash doesn’t interupt the ceremony, and most ceremony locations have rules about that anyway,  and to turn off ringers and stuff. But I think you come off a psycho controlling bride to try and take away a bunch of adults cell phones from them or exspect them to not take pictures at the reception. 

Post # 13
Member
57 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

It may be worth thinking about this from the other side. We had people taking photos throughout the day, during the hour long church ceremony; afterwards, outside the church; during our professional photos with the family; at the cocktail reception and after that at dinner, etc.

From my perspective, it was not distracting at all, and we were so glad to have different perspectives on the day. I like some friends’ photos as much as the professional photos, because they have heart, which makes them special. It was also really sweet that they cared enough to take and share the photos with us.

What everyone says is true, the day goes by so fast, it’s fun to relive the memories when you see your friends’ photos. Hope this helps!

Post # 15
Member
7749 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

Well if it’s just for those 15 minutes it’s not too bad. (To be honest I never pull my camera out during the ceremony anyway, but I know lots of people do). Put a note in the program. Try something which explains why and also reassures them there will be lots of time for photos, like:

“So as not to distract the official photographer and videographer, we ask that guests not take photos during the ceremony. There will be lots of time for photos after the ceremony and during the reception.”

p.s. google for words like this and I’m sure you’ll find a sample somewhere on the web.

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