(Closed) Update: Post-Op Questions Answered

posted 7 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
72 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I don’t have any advice for you but I am a post-partum nurse and I have women all the time of had had surgeries/treatments/etc and still have normal and healthy pregnancies and I just wanted to encourage you!!

Post # 4
Member
14495 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

You are so awesome to share this.  I am just thrilled that you have the answers that will help you become a mother and make you comfortable with it.  A year isn’t horrible, give you time to start storing up on diapers and you can start picking up things here and there.

Don’t let yourself get down about the weight loss.  If you can find a workout buddy that will make it easier, maybe someone from WB or HB.  I wish I was there then I could do it with you, I need someone to kick my butt to do it.

((HUGS)) 

Post # 6
Member
494 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Sent from my Android

Sent from my Android

Sent from my Android

Post # 8
Member
494 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Sent from my Android

Post # 9
Member
6350 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

I know you might not feel like it, but it all sounds fairly positive πŸ™‚ It’s good that the endo is only mild (and doesn’t seem to affect your ovaries too much), as this shouldn’t have too much impact on fertility/TTC (the stats are basically, if 100 women without endo TTC for 1 year, 84 will fall pregnant; if 100 women with minimal-mild endo TTC for 1 year, 75 will fall pregnant). Obviously there’s still the PCOS, but, treatments are really successful for PCOS, and now it’s been diagnosed, they’ll be able to make sure you get the right treatment.

It’s normal to feel emotional after something like this, as it’s quite a long to take in, not just in terms of obvious worries like fertility, but also because being told you have a chronic condition is very tough. There’s a forum in the UK which is quite active; it’s for endo, but there are a couple of ladies on there who have PCOS too. I found it really helpful both before and after my diagnosis; I got a lot of great tips, info and advice, and it can be nice to just have a little rant if you’re having a bad day. Here’s the link:

http://endoboard.yuku.com/directory

There’s also a lot of really useful info here:

http://www.endometriosis-uk.org/information.html

If you click on ‘publications’ there are a load of information leaflets on everything from surgery, to medical treatments, to fertility, to alternative therapies (which I know you didn’t ask about, but which I would strongly recommend looking into, esp as you’ll be limited in terms of pain relief while TTC; I’ve found certain foods trigger mine (red meat; alcohol; caffeine; processed foods) and cutting down on these have helped (wheat and dairy can also be triggers))

Also, one thing I’d pick up on where I don’t agree with your consultant, is that pregnancy can be a ‘cure’. Some women do find that symptoms lessen during pregnancy and while breastfeeding, but this is mainly due to the fact you aren’t menstruating; basically, it acts a bit like hormonal treatments (eg injection, mini-pill, coil), but most women will find their symptoms return within a year or so after giving birth/stopping breastfeeding. Long-term your best bets are hormonal methods.

The other thing I’d look into a bit more is the Mirena coil, as it can be associated with cysts, and isn’t usually recommended in the UK for women with PCOS for this reason; usually, the combined pill is preferred as it regulates your cycle. So maybe do some more research into this, and try to see the best specialist in PCOS that you can.

I do agree with her re diet though I’m afraid; it’s really important to lose weight, esp if you are overweight, as being overweight can make the symptoms of PCOS worse, as well as affect your fertility, so it’s kind of a double whammy; fertility treatments are also not as effective. I know it’s difficult, but it is possible to lose weight naturally with PCOS, and this is your best bet. I find Slimming World great (not sure if you have this?) as you can eat a lot and don’t feel hungry, and it really works (plus it’s sustainable). If you’re struggling with weight loss, I’d keep an exercise and food diary; it can be quite eye-opening when you start writing things down, you can really see how things add up.

Post # 11
Member
5572 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@AmeliaBedelia: I’m glad that you got all of your answers and thank you for sharing!! It does sound like she’s optimistic which is definitely a great thing.

As far as diet, I’ve done a lot of research regarding the best diet options to help with PCOS and what I’ve come up with is hands down low GI. If you google low GI diet a lot of information will come up about where different foods are placed on the glycemic index. You can also google low GI recipes and there are some sites that have quite a few of them. I totally know what you mean about it being a constant struggle, I’ve struggled with my weight for as long as I can remember. PCOS definitely doesn’t help!

Post # 12
Member
6350 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

It is really hard to lose weight, so I do sympathise; I don’t have PCOS but know women who do and it is much harder. But, it is doable. I can’t give much advice on metformin, as PCOS is not my ‘specialty’; what I would say is that if you are at all unhappy with your doctors suggestion, that you get a second opinion; at least that way if they say the same, you know she was right.

Re good foods: the people I know who’ve had most success have followed very strict diets; they have cut out all wheat, dairy, red meat, processed foods, alcohol, and caffeine; some have also cut out chicken and fish. They eat mainly fruit, veg, lentils, and dairy alternatives (like soya), or wheat-free foods. It’s quite restrictive IMPO, and I personally have had some success just with following a healthy, balanced diet with plenty of frui and veg, and cutting down on alcohol, red meat, processed foods, tomatoes (weirdly lol), and wheat; diary doesn’t seem to affect me, nor do white meats like chicken. I would say it’s a case of trial and error; or, just go all-out and follow a strict diet for around 1-2 months to see if there’s an improvement. Women I know who’ve taken the plunge have never looked back, so it can and does work.

Please don’t feel bad for feeling upset and emotional, and I didn’t mean to apply it’s good news per se; being diagnosed with endo is probably one of the hardest things I’ve dealt with, and I’ve been through a lot, so I don’t say that to be dramatic. What I meant was more that it’s positive fertility-wise (or fairly positive; obv the PCOS is still an issue). Even if endo is ‘only’ mild, it can have a huge impact, and it’s totally natural to feel angry, upset, confused, overwhelmed, etc. Do talk to people about how you feel; don’t keep everything inside. The board I’ve posted a link to is worth a look as I said if you feel down πŸ™‚

Post # 13
Member
3363 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

I sent you a PM, but should have added….

Metformin alone will not make you lose weight.  I was on Met for almost a year with no weight loss until I put a serious effort in.  I honestly don’t know if it helped with the weight loss or not.

 

Post # 14
Hostess
18643 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I’m glad that your surgery went well.  I have endo and possibly some undiagnosed something going on there that we can’t quite figure out but it does get easier to manage with time!

I’m not looking forward to TTC though because it means being off BC.

Post # 15
Member
1944 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2009

I’m glad you got your answers!! One thing I saw and if you readdressed it I’m sorry; but I saw where you thought your diet could control Endo? I’ll be honest, I have stage 3 Endo for almost 4 years now and I’ve never heard of any diet regimen being able to help it.

Post # 16
Member
6350 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

 @MissGreen:

A lot of women find diet really successful in managing pain. It won’t prevent growth of endo, but it can be used to manage symptoms. I personally get a huge flare of pain and symptoms with certain foods; when my endo was bad in 2010, if I drank, I had much more severe pain for up to 2 days after; similarly if I ate red meat or processed foods. I think there is science behind it (to do with hormones and chemicals I believe); there’s a good book on it which I’ll try to find the title of. Obv diet won’t help with things like adhesions though.

I’m in the UK and we now have a few specialist centres for endo, which advice on alternative therapies inc diet as well as more traditional treatment options.

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