(Closed) US and UK translation

posted 7 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 3
Member
5546 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

@CatyLady: It isn’t so much sayings but spellings, there are extra vowels in some places in British English and it makes me confused sometimes. 

Post # 4
Member
5009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2012

@chasesgirl: To add another version of English into the mix, I picked up “Sweet as” from Kiwi English.

It’s more the US wedding traditions that confuse me.

Post # 5
Member
9029 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I’ve spent several years in england so i know alot of the differences;

british use S instead of Z in words like civiliSation,

they spell center as Centre

they call cookies biscuits

THey call biscuits plain scones

they call chips- crisps

and call fries- chips

they call candy-sweets

and call pants- trousers

they call cotton candy- candy floss

and commonly say cheers as an alternative to thank you

But when it comes to sayings it really depends what part of america or part of england you are from

Also i’ll just add that since the english language originated from england I guess they’re using the right words and we over here in america have corrupted it lol

Post # 6
Member
5546 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

@bells: Corrupted and added phrases from the million and one other countries that have been a major influance on America

Post # 7
Member
9029 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@chasesgirl: yeah definitely!

Post # 8
Member
3624 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@bells: and they call underwear – pants!  That can get confusing if you say you’re not wearing any pants! Or if you’re pants are too tight, or if your pants fell down. LOL.

Post # 9
Member
5095 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

In Britain, a “fancy dress” party doesn’t mean you put on an evening gown and a tuxedo!

Post # 12
Member
5093 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

One of my good friends married a British gentleman.  They went to London to visit his family while they were still just dating, and she mentioned something about her fanny pack.  The groom had to explain to her why his parents started turning pink.

I like the word “garage.”  It’s pronounced “guh-RAHZJ” here in the States, but it’s “GAIR-ehdj” in the UK.

Post # 13
Member
3624 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@mightywombat: you’re going to leave us hanging?? what does it mean!? 😉

@prewitt: Ah, see, that is smart. I never thought of that.

Post # 14
Member
10714 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2012

color and colour always makes me smile.

check and cheque too.

Post # 15
Member
1986 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@CatyLady: I used to have two cats named Boxers and Knickers. 

Anywho, it use to really confuse me when on British TV shows they would ask if someone was pissed. When they were really asking if they had been drinking.

Post # 16
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

Here’s a weird UK phrase I don’t know the meaning of: pajama dodger.  I saw it on Top Gear the other night.  I think what the host (Jeremy, for anyone who watches, lol) said was, “If this car can stand up to firefighters, it can stand up to your children’s pajama dodgers.”  What does that mean?!

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