(Closed) vaccinations

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
1537 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@northernazbride: My first year of university I went into the RN program (have since switched majors), but we had a segment of biology class where we actually had to debate topics like these so we could learn the pros and cons. I am for vaccanations, but I also do recognize the anti-vaccine points as well. One girl in our class was hoping to become a homeopathic nurse and obviously advocated against. It might be helpful to do some research on your own. Many people make the choice for or against based on their beliefs.

I know many of the “against” advocates try to focus their arguments on the fact that vaccines have some harmful additives, such as formaldehyde. These advocates also suggest that we are not allowing nature to take its course by adding these viruses and bugs to our system through vaccinations and there are many other valid (and some invalid) points that are raised as well.

For those who are “pro” there is a general ideology that by adding a small denatured (altered, usually “dead”) virus or bug to our systems we are preventing further more large scale spread of disease (so a little exposure to harm to avoid a more serious exposure to harm). Also, we can look back to historical uses of vaccinations to see that they have benefited the world in general. Take, for example, the polio vaccination. We have now erraticated this disease from our populations because of vaccinations. They are also very useful for children and the elderly who are at higher risk of contracting infections and diseases in some cases.

Each vaccine is different, so it is always good to do specific research into them.

Post # 4
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

We decided to follow the traditional vax schedule, but we break up the number of shots Addie receives in a visit.  We try not to do more than three vaccines in a single visit (one oral and two shots).  We’re switching doctors right now, but Addie goes in for her 6 month appointment and two shots next Tuesday.  Next Thursday we’ll go in and complete the rest.  We also use preservative-free vaccines.

We always knew we would fully vaccinate because we firmly believe that vaccines save lives.  If we chose not to vaccinate, we’d be relying on other people to vaccinate their children for the safety of ours.  I’d rather not put my child’s safety in the hands of another.  After discussing our options with our doctor, he recommended doing the traditional vaccine schedule because vaccines today do not contain a lot of the additives and preservatives they did in the past.  He said allergic reactions are very minimal nowadays, and we only really need to be concerned if our families have a history of allergies to the vaccines.  This isn’t an issue for us, so we’re going ahead with the regular schedule.

Also, I know not everyone vaccinates for Hep B, but we did that one, as well.  Both my husband and I have to be vaccinated because of our jobs (we work at water/sewer plant) and although it’s pretty unlikely Addie would ever be exposed, she visits us at work pretty often.  I’d rather be safe than sorry in our case.

Post # 5
Member
57 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@mrs.peters.to.be: great post!

 

we will be special ordering what I guess are “fresh” vaccines, with no preservatives in them.  They are more expensive and must be given within a certain timefrme of ordering, but there is no fourmaldehyde, mercury, or any of the other potentially harmful additives in them.  My brother wrks for a Pharma company and wont give his daughter anything else

Post # 6
Member
2821 posts
Sugar bee

I think I’ll just go with the CDC recommended vaccination schedule

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/2010/10_0-6yrs-schedule-pr.pdf

Most of the diseases on there are fairly serious – besides for chicken pox (Varicella) and the Flu, but even those can be serious for young children.  I had shingles, which is from Varicella, in high school and it wasn’t horrible but I’d prefer if I hadn’t gotten it, especially since I may get it again.  So I’ll probably immunize against Varicella.  Personally, I don’t always get a flu shot every year but especially at first I’ll probably immunize my kid.  I remember getting terrible 104 fevers as a kid and even if it’s just being selfish as a mommy I’d rather not have to watch my kid go through that if avoidable. 

Some of the diseases are less common in the US now so vaccination may seem a bit less necessary but they do exist in other parts of the world and people are traveling a lot more and can bring diseases back.  Also there do tend to be outbreaks still so most diseases aren’t at a point that I’d feel secure enough taking the risks of the child getting the disease.

Post # 7
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@LoveTheLake:  We do this as well.  🙂  It’s really not even that big of a hassle; we just have to make sure to keep our appointments because they do not have a very long shelf-life.

Post # 8
Member
57 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

@Mrs. Spring: Im so glad I now “know” someone else who does!  Ill have to come to you with questions…you know, in 7 months when I am due lol

Post # 10
Member
438 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I’m not a mommy yet (not even married yet) but I’m not going to vaccinate my kids.  I just don’t like the idea of putting unnatural things in my body if I don’t have to, so why would I do that to my children?  Some vaccines also seem sort of pointless….like polio. When was the last time you heard of somebody having polio?  I may be totally wrong, but that’s just my 2 cents.  My theory is, if God wants me (or my child) to get a particular illness, I’m going to get it if I had the vaccine or not.

Post # 11
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

@ILuvDance17:  Actually, if you look at publications by the CDC or WHO, polio is still in an issue in certain parts of the world, and recently cases have started cropping up in many countries where it had been totally eradicated (including in the US). 

I think religious or moral objections to vaccines are valid, but it is important to do the research on what risks you’re taking by not vaccinating your child.

Post # 12
Member
329 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

I’m a special ed teacher and am constantly hearing the “vaccinate vs not” debate (thanks to Jenny McCarthy and her preaching on how vaccines are what triggered her son’s autism –  but that’s another rant of mine for another day…. haha). I don’t have kids, but I feel strongly that it’s important to vaccinate. I am a fan of vaccinations in my personal life (Flu, H1N1, etc…). I typically have some side effect (fever, soreness, whatever), but I’ll take a day or 2 of minimal effects over a week of the Flu any time!

Post # 14
Member
2821 posts
Sugar bee

@northernazbride:  You’re right, antibodies are passed along in the breast milk.  However, the mommy has to be producing antibodies to that specific disease in order to protect her kid.  Mainly to the diseases people vaccinate against you have memory cells that can produce large amounts of antibodies if you encounter the bug, however, you’re normally only producing very very low amounts of antibodies to bugs you haven’t encountered in awhile (basically everything on the vaccine list).  And the memory cells that produce the antibodies aren’t passed along in breast milk.  So breast milk won’t provide protection against the diseases on the vaccine list for people in the US.

What is transferred are antibodies to any circulating viruses (like common colds) and bacteria that we pass along to one another every day. 

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