Vent thread: Owners bringing their aggressive dogs to the park

posted 4 months ago in The Lounge
Post # 16
Member
2248 posts
Buzzing bee

sbl99 :  my boy is kind of aggressive towards other dogs (no idea why—this just happened in his adult life, as he was well socialized after we found him as a pup and seemed to make friends easily), so I know better than to take him to a social area unleashed. it seems ignorant at best, completely inconsiderate at worst, for these two people to take their aggressive dogs to a communal area and have the audacity to not even watch them. I’d take photos of your baby’s injuries, and confront them that if there is a next time, you’ll be getting the authorities involved.

this is a bad situation not just for your dog, but for theirs as well, because if they do harm another animal, they could be taken away and put down. 30 unsupervised minutes just doesn’t seem worth ruining lives! 

Post # 18
Member
2248 posts
Buzzing bee

sbl99 :  my vet also told me that dog parks scare her, because even the friendliest of dogs can have unpredictable reactions to other strange dogs behaviors. it really isn’t worth it :/ is there an open area where the two of you can play fetch to help him let off steam?

Post # 19
Member
2763 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2017

Wtf, I would be so pissed.  I probably would have called them out for their unruly dogs and lack of supervision. Why should you have to avoid the dog park because of their poor behavior. That’s just crap!

Post # 21
Member
2152 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

sbl99 :  good to hear you’ll be avoiding the dog park. FWIW… him being not neutered will effect how he SMELLS to other dogs so even if he’s not acting threatening or behaving aggressively other dogs will still react differently to him. I’d keep an eye on him at the beach too until he gets neutered. 

Post # 22
Member
946 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2020

sbl99 :  I’d have to agree with somathemagical on this one. When unfixed dogs are at the park those hormones impact all dogs differently. Our 10 year old, arthritic puggle gets incredibly frisky around uncut doggos. He’s the slowest, laziest dog in the world but if a unclipped dog (male or female) is at the park he becomes hump-a-puggle and will run around and chase that dog down no matter how big or small. 

This is not to victim blame AT ALL because what happened to you sucks, but it is something you should be aware of. 

Post # 23
Member
241 posts
Helper bee

downonmulberry :  no, your examples are extreme. Everyone knows that dog parks are dangerous and you take that risk when you take your dog there. 

I can’t control what other people do, only what I do. And I don’t take my dogs to dog parks. Lol

Post # 25
Member
1242 posts
Bumble bee

It’s actually common for docile dogs to get somewhat agressive with an uncut male. The testosterone projects as a threat. So the other dogs try to exert dominance. It’s typical canine pack behaviour. It’s sorting of hierarchy.  

Post # 26
Member
2152 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

sbl99 :  Reminder that 👏🏽They👏🏽Are👏🏽Animals. You cannot and will not ever be able to predict the behavior of a dog especially when hormones are involved. You don’t know if those dogs have ever hurt another one. You can’t tell an owner to muzzle a dog that you don’t know. It truly might have been a 1 time thing due to your dogs hormones. 

You’re suffering from NoT mY dOg syndrome right now big time. Scentific research has shown that neutered males are much more likely to attack and act aggressively towards an uncut male out of fear. So yes… “viciously attack and injure and draw blood” can be blamed on his “uncut balls”. 

Post # 27
Member
2488 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2017 - Courthouse

I’m sorry Bee. 

I cant imagine how mad and frustrated you are. 

A pet peeve of mine (no pun intended) is when people don’t train their dogs. It’s true that they are unpredictable and even a well trained dog can act out. However, the fact the owners weren’t even watching their dog or trying to step in tells me everything. 

I was at a dog park about a year ago with my pit bull. There was a dog that attacked a dog, started a fight and then ran over to my dog. I was seriously wondering why the owner hadn’t removed her dog as it just clearly fought another dog. So this dog kept jumping on my dog and my dog didn’t care. She kept ignoring it. Well the dog decided to bite into my dog’s rib cage to get a reaction. They ended up fighting and I was so scared. Finally the dumb owner left after her dog’s second attack of the day. I’m super sensitive to this stuff too bc I own a pit bull so I know she’ll always get blamed. 

Bottom line is you can train and research all you want but people are dumb. Looking back, I would have told the lady to get her dog away from my dog and leave the park before she had a chance to attack. I think more people just need to speak out. Dog disobedience isn’t okay and can be dangerous.

Post # 29
Member
2152 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

sbl99 :  I’m simply saying that aggression happens and dog parks are dangerous and hormones do matter. A dog park is only as safe as the humans watching the dogs. Sounds like this is one to avoid.

I’m sorry for what happened to you and your dog. That must have been very scary. 

Post # 30
Member
3837 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2017

 

I’ve been learning about ‘fear periods’ in dogs – specific times at which negative experiences can have a huge impact on their behaviour. It explains a lot about my dog who didn’t have a positive upbringing as far as other dogs are concerned. You might want to be extra careful about avoiding any further bad experiences for a couple of months as your dog is around the age to enter the second ‘fear period’. This article explains it better! 

http://www.drjensdogblog.com/the-dark-side-of-socialization-fear-periods-and-single-event-learning/

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