(Closed) Venue "creating" charges after the wedding (LONG)

posted 4 years ago in Money
Post # 2
Hostess
2916 posts
Sugar bee

WOW. That is so, so shady and crazy. I think you guys handled this very well. I absolutely would not pay this either. They are not able to charge your credit card without your consent. Definitely fight this.

Post # 3
Member
361 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

If its not in the contract, then yeah, you do have a leg to stand on… but without seeing/reading the contract I wouldn’t know unfortunately..

Post # 4
Member
459 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2017

Yikes!!  I sounds like you are handling this very well.  It’s very smart to only handle business at this point in writting, that way you have the documentation.  You’re not out in left field here, you had a contract. They can’t change the prices because they magically decided to that day, or charge your credit card as they see fit.

Post # 6
Member
288 posts
Helper bee

My response to them would only be “show me where these terms were agreed to in writing and then I will pay according to the terms of the contract”. Was a smart idea for you to cancel your CC, shady activities going on for sure.

Post # 7
Member
361 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

View original reply
smoocheepoo:  Well, if theres nothing in the contract stating “additional charge may apply, or “pricing subject to change” yadda yadda.. then definately dont pay it. I believe if you paid X amount for up to 160 guests then the ONLY reason they should charge you extra would be if they went above and beyond to accomedate additional guests beyond their capacity of 160. So definately don’t pay.. Make sure you are using e-mail coorespondence to have everything in writing if possible also..

Post # 8
Member
7471 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

View original reply
smoocheepoo:  They can record whatever they want to, and unless they have YOU stating that you are coming in to pay, it’s meaningless. Don’t let them bully you. 

If they did not tell you of the extra charges, and it’s not buried in the contract fine print anywhere, then they have no legal grounds for collecting. Tell them you’ll see them in court. I would caution against leaving reviews, making comments online, etc; a clever lawyer can take almost any statement and turn it into a talking point in a legal matter, and while that won’t change the fact that you don’t have to pay for what you did not agree to pay for, it can make things more annoying for you.

If your credit card company can document them attempting to charge the card, you could/should probably report that to your state/city business licensing or consumer affairs agency. If the card was given expressly for paying the bar tab and you never authorized any other charges, that could be a very serious violation of their business license (because it’s technically not legal).

Post # 10
Member
694 posts
Busy bee

At this point, I would send a summary letter detailing the additional charges they want you to pay. Tell them you want them to reply in writing with where you agreed to these charges or you will consider their request for payment invalid. In the letter, also indicate that they do not have permission to charge your credit card until they provide proof that you’re actually indebted to them.

The thing is… if you let them sue you, you’ll end up paying just as much for an attorney to represent you as you would just paying it off. If you keep everything though, you may be able to represent yourself. Who knows if they’ll even come after you though.

 

Post # 12
Member
57 posts
Worker bee

A verbal/oral contract or agreement is still a contract. Depending on the initial contract (which may or may not state something about that written contract being the “entire agreement” between the parties), the circumstances, etc., oral terms can be added to ita fter the fact. You’re not 100% safe just because someone didn’t get it in writing. Just so you know!

Post # 13
Member
733 posts
Busy bee

You should probably talk to a lawyer, they know the laws in your state.

We spoke with one recently about something Not Wedding Related, and he told us that e-mails are not considered evidence in court.

Post # 14
Member
124 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

I’m not a legal guru by any means but I think you’re doing pretty well with this. I mean, you have 2 options: tuck your tail and pay for trumped up charges or stand your ground and say no.

Usually I find that companies that do this stuff aren’t used to getting called on it. In my experience it’s a bluff and since most people are too afraid to say no the company gets their sneaky little bonus out of 95% of people and backs down for the 5% who push back.

But even if this company does push back and escalate you can decide what to do as this unfolds. If they don’t back off then you can decide if it’s gotten so out of hand you’re ready to just pay and forget it or if you really do want to go to small claims court. So I’d stand your ground and try to stay relaxed while you wait for their next move…

Post # 15
Member
251 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Does your contract/ advertising say “seats 160 guests”? If they guarantee seating for 160, but can only seat 100 in reality, then they can’t really charge you for the extra tent for the deck to make up the extra 60 seats when it rains. 

if you booked it based on what they were advertising but that’s not what they’re offering, I think they’d have a hard time proving you owe them the $400.

As to the DJ, show him the contract for the agreed upon amount. He can’t just increase the prices after the wedding and expect you to pay it, especially if there’s no “subject to increases” clause written in the contract.

The topic ‘Venue "creating" charges after the wedding (LONG)’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors