(Closed) Was this maybe not as good a deal for the ring?

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
8738 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

@futuremrste:  I just did a search on the website where Darling Husband got my ring (and got a very good deal).

They have a plain platinum solitaire setting for: $600

And a F color VS1 clarity 1.08c excellent cut round brilliant for: $11,000. Round brilliants tend to be more expensive than other cuts of diamonds, also once you move from the .9c range to the 1c range there is a jump in price.

So that brings the ring total to $11,600 ($1,300 more than what you paid).

If he’s worried, have him get the ring appraised and see how the appraisal compares to the purchase price. Make sure to go to an independent appraiser. Also, you will need this appraisal to insure the ring.

F is in the colorless range and VS1 is a quality rating as well.

Also platinum is an expensive metal so that will push the price up.

I think you got a fine deal and it’s a beautiful ring.

Post # 4
Member
580 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I had a quick look on blue nile, for a F colour, ideal cut, VS1 clarity 1.09 round, it saying over 9,000, then you’ve got the setting and so on. Sounds good to me!

Post # 5
Member
835 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

You got a great deal….I went to a site and just put in your specifications and it came in around 15,000….. (with a similar setting, as well) ….sounds like you have a great ring!! And a great price!!

Post # 7
Member
8738 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

@futuremrste:  Color and Clarity do a lot to drive up the price.

For example a 1.08c round brilliant with SI1 clarity H color drops the price to around $8,000 and that’s still with excellent cut.

Also for comparison, different shapes of diamonds have different costs. A F color VS1 cushion cut that is 1.08 c is around: $6,000.

For some reason round brilliants are just a more expensive cut of diamond. Probably because they “Face up” larger so you get more surface area per carat. 

Also platinum is a very expensive metal. The plain solitaire setting in platinum is $600 whereas that same setting in 14k white gold is under $350.

Post # 8
Member
5189 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2010

@KatNYC2011:  Rounds are more expensive overall as more rough is lost when cutting them.

OP, even going down a colour grade or 2 can make a huge impact on price, as can going down on clarity (and great if you retain eye clean standards!). This does not make the latter stones “worse”, just not everyone requires or wants a D-F for example and are willing to go to lower colour for lower price or larger stone. For modern stones, that do have ideal cut standards, I would ensure to remain at ideal/excellent for cut and such as that to me is very important in how the stone performs and faces up, but people can save a lot by going to a near colourless stone and by going down in clarity a little (and choosing “better” inclusion types and placement).

Post # 9
Member
8738 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

@RayKay:  That’s right! I know I’ve heard that somewhere before (but couldn’t remember the reason off the top of my head). That reason makes a lot more sense than the larger face up surface area.

I also agree that you can still get a good looking “eye clean” stone for cheaper at lower color and clarity grades. However, purely technically speaking those stones are of slightly “lower quality” than stones with higher color and clarity grades. Now that does not mean anyone can tell the difference while admiring your ring on your finger, but the purpose of the GIA grading system is to rate stones on a quality scale. Eye clean stones are all fairly high quality, some are just higher quality than others.

However you have to take into account the shape of your stone when going down in grades.

For example, clarity is highly important in step cut shapes (emerald, ascher, etc) because the inclusions will be much more visible due to the ability to see straight down into the stone.

Post # 10
Member
5189 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2010

I wanted to add that you can save money sourcing your own stone with certain online vendors a well over jewelery stores and certain other vendors, but this generally requires more leg work and self-educating re stones. Not worth it for everyone!

Post # 11
Member
5189 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2010

@KatNYC2011:  Agreed. I was thinking more in lines of non step cuts. I do agree that going down is lower quality re GIA grading but I do not believe they are necessarily subjectively “less good” or “worse” as a stone. There are people who actually prefer lower colours and “birthmarks”! The GIA is great for buying on “specs” but has its limits. For example GIA grades antique OECs on modern Ring Bearer standards, which of course gives OECs terrible results, but OECs can be gorgeous standing on their own and should not be compared to a modern Ring Bearer (EGL is better for grading antique cuts). 

Post # 12
Member
891 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I think you got a great deal!

Post # 13
Member
8738 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

@RayKay:  I think we are in agreement on the use of the word “worse” and I agree you have more leeway with non-step cut stones as the way they are cut can help to hid in the inclusions and maximize sparkle.

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