(Closed) Wealth distribution in the US

posted 7 years ago in Money
Post # 62
Member
10635 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

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@Ettalie:  I don’t think all jobs should have to offer a living wage.  Teenagers living at home do not need a typical living wage.

There are 100k jobs that only require on the job training.

Post # 63
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816 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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@AB Bride:  Oh I agree some jobs should not be living wage jobs, but these are already typically set through part-time (aka not working 40 hrs) or summer jobs.  Those I agree could be done with less.  However, if someone does work 40 hrs per day for a year + I think its safe to assume these are typically not for teenagers living at home.  And that is where I believe the distinction lies, if someone has to spend the majority of their day working, it is required for self-sustinance (not some extra pocket money, or summer job experience) and as such a living wage is required otherwise, taxpayers are subsidizing companies for cheap labor.

Edited to add: my idea of a living wage is as follows: healthy nutritious food (not fancy food – so we don’t pay more in health care costs), public transport, heating/electricity, basic housing and a bit extra to help spur economy and for retirement savings (otherwise we too end up taking over those costs).

Post # 64
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@AB Bride:  How about then anyone who works full time?

Post # 65
Member
1680 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

So here’s a curveball to the conversation: what do you bees think about localizing the economy? IE: stop spending money at Walmart and major shopping complexes, building our own furniture, clothes, and food. Trading services with others. Bartering. I wish life could be this simplistic.

 

Of course our government is too far in command of our society and the corporations basically control the government, but wouldn’t it be nice to have a society where people got by with what they needed most and enjoyed simply living instead of spending money on useless stuff?

 

Moreover, think about this. Those things that we want? We want them CHEAP. ($15 for this mascara, no way!) So we underpay companies, to underpay factories, to underpay material production so that we can buy everything cheaper. And all along the way each worker is underpaid for store clerking, managing, shipping, factory working, mining. It’s a disgusting, endless cycle.

 

 

 

Post # 66
Member
816 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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@OnceUponATime:  I believe that when society decides to support the local economy than companies will listen.  When society makes an uproar and vote with their money (as with the RBC “scandal” as of late) then companies will make choices that will benefit the society they are in.  Thats why I shop and cooperatives which provide living wages and profits are put back into society or the buisnes (aka hire more workers, etc).  I support local farmers and try my very best to support local artisans.  I understand not everyone can do these things but if we evaluate our consumptions choices maybe its worth it to spend a bit more on a local good and end up with “less goods” overall than filling our homes with cheap stuff.

Post # 67
Member
10635 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

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@peachacid:  I would be on board with that if it was difficult to obtain a full time job that pays a living wage.

 

I see so many people who work full time not for the money, but for the social aspect, and to have something to do.  I’m not really comfortable with increase wages across the board as they would also increase the cost of living.  Remember though, I am basing that based on how things are here currently.

 

I remember when foriegn students had the rules about where they were allowed to worked eased greatly.  All the sudden, the places on campus had to radically reduce their hours and they never went back to normal.  They just couldn’t afford to hire people to work at the same hours.  I think this would be a big problem if wages were increased for all full time jobs and to be competitive, the part time wages would also increase.

 

Post # 68
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@AB Bride:  I think it is difficult to obtain a full-time job that pays a living wage.  

Post # 69
Member
1680 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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@Ettalie:  That’s fantastic to hear that I’m not alone in my thoughts 🙂 It’s wonderful to know others care!

 

My family does the same! We shoot game and farm (canning and freezing!) . When I buy from the store I always look for the smaller companies (like small farm cheeses and organic products from small farms) If we buy mass produced brands I try to buy Newman’s Own. (They donate all profits to charity!) We can’t afford as much, and at time we’re guilty of shopping at Walmart. I just wish we could afford/had time to make/do everything ourselves!

Post # 70
Member
8942 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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@jenilynevette:  The poor are not the ones milking the middle class, the rich are. They taxes they avoid would easily EASILY make up for any milking that the poor are doing. Not saying anyone should be, but to me there’s a difference between sketchy accounting to help you feed your family and sketchy accounting to help you maintain your 6 vacation homes. 

Flat taxes place a disproportionate burden on the poor, for reasons already explained by PPs. 

Post # 71
Member
816 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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@peachacid:  In certain sectors, I completely agree.  Namely retail.  Others like STEM fields seem to pay rather decently but it does vary region to region.  My Fiance is paid much less due to our location and if he were living alone his quality of life would be quite impacted but if he moved to another part of the country he would have a much higher wage.  I suppose that is one thing that does get lost in the discussion.  How much a say does location incomes/living costs have a say in the matter?  Should wages for a certain skill be lower than living since its not required, or benefits slashed to encourage certain skill sets to go where demand is higher?  This is where public policy gets very tricky =)  But thank you for bringing these topics to the table it is very interesting to get my mind to think about all these aspects!

Post # 72
Member
10635 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

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@peachacid:  Companies are currently paying for flights from people on the far side of the country to pay them to work here and then they get to go home on their off days.  The need no formal education for these jobs and they pay well.  If they could hire enough local people to do them, don’t you think they would instead of paying for flights for these people to go back and forth?

 

Post # 73
Member
816 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

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@OnceUponATime:  Nice to hear!  I do canning though I’m sill new in the whole process, certainly not as good as my mom!  I’m also hoping this year to do home made pasta to store; and eventually I’d like to hunt to minimze industrial farming.  I do have friends who hunt and they are very generous with sharing their kills, and of course I try my best to make an amazing meal in compensation!  My cheeses only come artisinal farmers I think the quality and taste is 100 fold better than anything industrialized.  The only thing I have a harder time finding is clothing but when I can I try to buy from industrialized countries (US, UK) which have better protection for their workers and higher environmental standards.  I hope to one day pick up sewing and knitting so I can make a few things for day to day as well.  I think with these choices companies will learn and slowly bring things back (for example I heard some manufacturing is now being brought back to the US since people are staring to dislike the quality of out-of-country electronics and due to higher transportation costs).  I may be one person, or one household, but with a few more I think we have the ability to make an impact through our purse strings!

Post # 74
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@Ettalie:  i’m pretty sure living wages are calculated according to where a person lives.  For example, if you live in NYC, then $10 an hour isn’t even enough to live.  In a place like Anytown, Montana, I’m sure $10/hour would be enough.  There’s a way to calculate it.

The wage issue that bothers me the most is when I see jobs that require a lot of education that then only pay like $10/hour.  If you have to get a BA or higher to qualify for a job, that job should pay well.  

 

That all being said…I don’t think the government should really be in charge of stuff like this!!  I don’t know!!!

Post # 75
Member
9916 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

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@AB Bride:  What jobs are you talking about?  That sounds nice…!  I am thinking more along the lines of people who work in the service industry.

Post # 76
Member
10635 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

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@peachacid:  In oil and gas, along with the service companies.

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