(Closed) Wedding craft terms?

posted 8 years ago in DIY
Post # 3
Member
1982 posts
Buzzing bee

-Cuttlebug: die cutting machine, you run a die and a piece of paper and cutting mat through it and it cuts out the shape.

-cricut (like “cricket”): computer cutting machine. About the size and shape of a printer, cuts out shapes from cartridges or from your computer (if you have the right software)

-gocco: It’s an increasingly hard to find screenprinting device made popular in japan and now in the US. It can be substituted with the new Yudu, widely available at Michaels (use with 220 mesh screen).

Good luck!

Post # 4
Member
1060 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010 - Anela Garden Chapel & Japanese Cultural Center, Honolulu

edit – above says it much better! 😀

cuttlebug is an embossing/die cutting machine..cricut is a customizable cutting machine, and gocco is a screen printing machine!

 

Post # 5
Member
1982 posts
Buzzing bee

Oops, and I’m going to add xyron: a 1.5″ to 9″ wide device that applies an adhesive backing to anything you stick through it. (Adhesive cartridges and cricut cartridges are sold separately, as are the gocco inks and the dies for the cuttlebug)

A Sizzix is similar to the Cuttlebug.

Also, there is a new cake cricut that cuts out fondant for cake applications, yet to hit stores.

A Gypsy is a handheld device used to design cricut cutouts on the go.

Wow, I think that’s it!

Post # 6
Member
300 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Can’t help with the first two, but the Gocco is an amazing printing device.  Mrs. Lemon and Mrs. Penguin have some awesome examples of Gocco projects on their WeddingBee blogs.  

To simplify, the Gocco transfers carbon images that you can design yourself onto a master screen.  The “flashing” or “burning” process creates tiny holes in the master screen.  You then ink up the master screen, and the inks travel through the holes and leave an imprint on your paper, sort of like a “stamp.”  I may have confused you, but the Bee ladies I mentioned did a great job of de-mystifying the process.  

I am Gocco-ing all of our paper products for the wedding – feel free to check out my blog posts tagged “Gocco” if you want!  I tried to do a step-by-step guide with pictures – the link to my blog is on my profile.  Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

A cuttlebug is a hand cranked machine that embosses paper. This may actually be my next purchase, just don’t tell my Fiance 😉

A cricut is essentially a fancy machine that cuts paper. It’s mostly used for scrapbooking and cardmaking. You can buy cartridges or use different programs to tell it what shapes/letters/words/designs to cut out. I have one and LOVE it! I don’t take it out as often as I’d like to though since I have to set it up on my dining room table and all the bits of paper can create a bit of a disaster.

A gocco…. How to explain this? It’s sort of like a small desktop silkscreening machine. It was produced in Japan and production of them stopped in the 90s I believe. I bought a Yudu (which is made by Provocraft, the same people who make the Cricut) which is a much larger machine and requires I think a bit less patience and raw material. Gocco produces gorgeous results but supplies can be hard to come by and expensive from what I’ve heard, so that’s why I got the Yudu instead. I’m going to print all my stationary items on my Yudu.

Post # 8
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

@labouroflove – Couldn’t you use your regular cricut for fondant? I fail to see from the little commercial they did what makes it so different. If you had a “food” designated blade and matt, and set the settings properly, I don’t see why you couldn’t use a regular cricut. Am I missing something?

Post # 9
Member
1982 posts
Buzzing bee

@bakerella I thought so too, but I think it’s different because of the thickness?

Or it’s just a ploy to make more money.

Post # 10
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

@laboroflove – I know nothing about fondant (it’s the only thing in baking I haven’t mastered yet!!!) but I’m going to try it this weekend for sh!ts and giggles! I’ll let you know what happens! My guess is that it’s a money making ploy. You can cut cork on the darn thing, don’t tell me you can’t do fondant!

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