WFH etiquette during COVID

posted 2 weeks ago in Career
Post # 16
Member
151 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

Gosh her behavior is completely inappropriate. I don’t know that I have the answer for you, but reading through everything it also sounds like you’re dealing with unnecessary stress from how WFH has been implemented by your office.

 It doesn’t sound very functional. Being logged in all day honestly made me gasp. My office allowed WFH as needed prior to the pandemic. People time block on outlook 365, so we can see everyone’s availability. We also utilize yammer through outlook. All of our meetings are on Teams which allows us to also DM coworkers and they can set their teams profiles to available, busy, in a   meeting, do not disturb, or away. When people go on PTO, they send a calendar invite to the team along with who is covering what aspect of their work while gone. Their ‘away’ auto response also gives the same information. We also haven’t used landlines in years. It’s all digital so you can check calls from your computer.

I realize she’s causing the immediate stress, but I feel you’re also experiencing some stress from poor WFH structure. I’m sorry Bee that’s a tough place to be.

Post # 17
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

Is your work paying for her internet? If not then insisting she be available online is kind of pushing things in my book. She may not be able to afford an internet plan that enables her to be online all day or may even live somewhere that has connectivity issues. The next suburb over from me is like that. It is basically an internet and mobile phone dead zone. 

The only thing you can do at this stage since her supervisor is ok with her not being available online, is to complain to your manager when you are unable to complete your work due to her not completing her work. You probably should stop doing her work for her if you want anything to actually happen. As far as your and her supervisor is concerned the work is getting done and that is all that matters to them. When it doesn’t get done then it reflects badly on them. Remember to keep a paper trail of reporting your issues to your supervisor.

Post # 18
Member
533 posts
Busy bee

If it’s not mandatory to be logged in all day, then I don’t think you can expect her to be. I think that issue is just a matter of having a different work style. My office has an instant message system, some people use it a lot, and others never do and prefer to just email or call.

Post # 19
Member
1490 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2019

I would focus on where her not doing her work prevents you from doing yours. Stop picking up her slack. Each time she doesn’t complete a task make a note of it in a document, email her asking her to complete said task and let you know when it’s done and giving her a deadline. If she doesn’t complete task, reply again asking her to complete it and cc her boss. Note that in your document that she didn’t do it and her boss was cc’d. Once you have a document that has several concrete examples of her not doing her job and proof that she was asked and her boss was aware, you can’t take that list to your boss and talk about it. That’s the long term plan. 

Short term, just stop doing things for her. Draw a line and only do what you are paid to do. If something falls off and doesn’t happen because of her you just make it real clear x task is waiting on her and forward whoever is asking the email of you asking her to do it to show whoever is asking why it isn’t done. Keep putting it back on her. 

Post # 20
Member
6915 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2016

View original reply
@christina611:  So my office uses Skype to communicate (also email) and we all telecommuted often before this COVID business forced it to be an every day occurrence. When you say she’s unavailable…do you mean Skype shows her as away? Or does she literally sign off? Because those are 2 different things. Even in an in-office environment you’re allowed breaks during your work day. You can get up to go to the bathroom, grab lunch, maybe grab a coffee. It kind of sounds like you want her to be glued to her computer for 8 straight hours during the day. And the only way you’d give her some slack is if she had kids and since she doesn’t you don’t think she has any legitimate excuses to take a break from work. Does she not respond to emails in a timely manner? 

It does sound like she’s a sub-par employee in general. I used to be an admin and I know what that job entails so I understand your frustration with the rest of it. But I do have to ask if when you get to the office and end up having to fix her mistakes, do you let her know? Do you tell her what she did that was wrong? Do you try to have her correct them? Does she know that these letters have all these problems? 

Post # 21
Member
7640 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

If your supervisor agrees that the letter shold be as close to done as possible, I’d push back on the admin on unfinished work. “Sorry, this doesnt look complete. Can you update it and send it back to me? I’ll be here until 3, so as long as you send it before then it can go out today.” And stick to it. She sends it 3:02? Her fault for missing the deadline, multiple times. 

At my office we are doing rotating shifts in the office for things like this. There is no way any of us would expect the other to do their damn work AND send it out in the limited time we have! 

Post # 22
Member
521 posts
Busy bee

Skype usually shows you as “Away” if you haven’t touched your keyboard in a certain number of minutes.  Your company’s IT policy may be different from mine, but I can easily check for how long a person has been “Away” – and if it’s over 60 minutes, that ain’t a lunch break.  If your job involves typing anything, Skype would show you as available, unless you change your status manually.

Two incompetent losers in a row hired by the same person is a bit too much to be a coincidence as well.

Post # 24
Member
29 posts
Newbee

Wow that is very nice of you to be doing her work for her, but I think it is too nice. I would stop helping her completely. Someone like that is just going to take advantage of your kindness, and leave you with more and more work.

And if these tasks at the office start to get muddled by your superiors, be careful that they don’t start blaming you for work not done or done incorrectly, when it’s not your job in the first place.

 

 

Post # 25
Member
6915 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2016

View original reply
@christina611:  Well if the data entry isn’t getting done, I’m assuming that’ll bite her in the ass in due time. But if it isn’t part of your job to supervise her and micromanage her time, let her actual supervisor focus on that part.

Worry about the part that IS affecting your job. Stop doing her work for her. If she isn’t responding either via email or Skype in a timely fashion during work hours that is a problem. And if her supervisor is being a pushover and it’s directly affecting you then you have a reason to escalate the issue. 

Post # 26
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee

How does she possibly still have a job

Away on skype means away from computer so unless a big part of her role is non compuer related tasks (which for admin and wfh i highly doubt) shes literally not working for hours and doing whatever else and getting paid for it

Your supervisor frnakly doesnt seem to care much so my advice is start job searching and work for a company that actually hires competent people..

WFH and Covid is no reason to f*ck off.. I cant believe someone who is still on probation is behaving like this and has a job

Post # 27
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee

View original reply
@christina611:  Shes watching TV, doing hosue chores etc point is shes not workinf

if she doesnt have enough work then she should be part time and paid accordingly

 

Post # 28
Member
38 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2010

If this was happening to me, I would contact the employee and copy their supervisor and ask about their workload, as I was expecting them to x, y, and z for me on a regular basis, and since performance was not adequate I was wondering if their workload was too much, and how we could re-prioritize.  Keeps from throwing them under the bus, but makes the problem known.

Post # 29
Member
189 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2020

Wow your job seems extremely leniant. if i tried any of what you described while i was working from home i would have been fired. I DO have 2 elementary school children that i have severly struggled with homeschooling because I was actually expected to put in 9 hours a day, sitting at my desk the entire time except for lunch and bathroom breaks. I was terrified to get caught “away” or not answer a call. 

I’m sorry you are picking up the slack for someone else, i hope you are able to work something out where she starts doing her fair share- this would irritate the heck out of me! 

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