(Closed) What GIA graded color diamond is your e-ring?

posted 7 years ago in Rings
  • poll: What GIA graded color diamond is your e-ring?

    D

    E

    F

    G

    H

    I

    J

    K or lower

    I don't know

  • Post # 32
    Member
    6571 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: October 2013

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    @joya_aspera:  You have yellow gold, right? You dont think its … less flattering to the stone, do you? Because I got a rose gold setting last week and something abotu it looks … off. I was wondering if maybe the warm metal wasnt meshing with the “E” colored stone … (not my e-ring). Thoughts?

    PS Sorry for the thread jack, OP!

    Post # 33
    Member
    12244 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2013

    Mine’s GIA certified D color!

    Post # 34
    Member
    1530 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    Mine is an F, VS1, no flourscence

    Post # 35
    Member
    1566 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

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    @wrkbrk:  Thank you for reminding me

     

    OP: sorry for the threadjack!

    Post # 36
    Member
    1511 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

    My center stone is an F.  

     

     

    Lots of gorgeous rings in this thread!  

    Post # 37
    Member
    1344 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2013 - Vine Street Church

    E, VVS1

     

    Post # 38
    Member
    892 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

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    @Ozian:  Off topic, but, your nails are seriously gorgeous! I can never get mine all symmetrical and perfect like that!

    Post # 39
    Member
    223 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

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    @MrsPaperFlowers:  No report from GIA or a price tag should effect how you feel and love your ring. I’m am simply talking about marketplace and jewelry grade facts – nothing to do with personal opinions or aesthetics. Just trying to explain things because “colored diamonds” are kind of a niche and most ppl don’t know much about them.

    I didn’t know if you had previously mentioned what kind of diamond you had – but if the GIA report didnt mention treatment then you have a natural color diamond. I would say this is def. possible (& getting a great deal) with black and brown/chocolate/champagne color diamonds – they can be less expensive than white diamonds. Maybe even other colors because I don’t know your jeweler.

    Natural “fancy” colored are the crazy expensive – i.e. green, red, blue, bright yellow, purple, pink, orange and chameleon)  You can get black/brown w/o breaking the bank. Its just in recent years the chain stores have been heavily marketing black/brown diamonds that are treated – but many ppl aren’t aware of this because jewelry stores don’t tend to try and explain anything – just sell. But there are also natrual black/brown – brown and warm colorednaturals being more common. I “think” the LeVian “chocolate” diamonds are natural browns. (they just copyrighted the term “chocolate diamond” whereas tgave have been called brown or cognac for decades)

    Jewelers now adays have just found ways to use diamonds that in the past had been deemed unusable due not being a perfect color or clarity – with these new techniques. (Also with colorless diamonds they’ve come up with “clarity enhanced” as a way of trying to rid a stone of visible inclusions. Market wise the “clarity enhancement” hurts the value but from what I understand usually looks good.)

    Post # 40
    Member
    15144 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    Mines a F, but such a small variation in color is impossible to really capture in a photo.

    Post # 41
    Member
    1566 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

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    @MirnaMinkoff:  ^_^ I’m pretty sure it’s a natural black with natural whites as alternating side stones.. I appreciate the insight about how it works! I knew a little about them, but not as much detail as you have provided, and I appreciate it!!!

     

    Again, OP: Sorry for the threadjack 🙂

    Post # 42
    Member
    2076 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: June 2014 - British Columbia

    G, I1 and Canadian-mined. 🙂

    Post # 43
    Member
    1566 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    OOH! And OP: here’s a picture of my rings!!

    Post # 44
    Member
    223 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

     

    Oh, here’s a good little blurb about diamond color grades from the gem association website:

    “Some lower color yellow diamonds may be referred to as “cape” or “canary.” Some brown diamonds may be referred to as “champagne” color. However, these fancy names for the lower colors of brown and yellow diamonds are marketing terms and are not used by major labs. As the diamond gets lower in color grade, it becomes less rare and hence less valuable. However, if the diamond has color below Z it is considered fancy color and then the prices will start to go back up. While a diamond may be many fancy colors, yellow is the most common. When the color becomes intense or vivid, the price of some yellow diamonds may be higher than the price of a D color diamond. Usually, the other colors of diamonds are rare and can be very expensive. Mostly, these colors are sought after by collectors. Red is the rarest of all colors and there are only a few truly red diamonds that have ever been mined. One million dollars per carat is not unheard of for a rare natural color red diamond.”

     

    Post # 45
    Member
    293 posts
    Helper bee

    GIA M

     

    Post # 46
    Member
    223 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

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    @MrsPaperFlowers:  Yup, from that photo and what you say I’d bet it’s a natural black. Very nice!

    If you had notguessed I’m a fan of natural colored diamonds – certain colors in particular – though my e-ring is a white (G color, OEC diamond, VVS2). I think the fact that nature manages to produce diamonds in an array of colors and shades fascinating (I’d love to see a real red diamond!)

    Nothing wrong with getting color enhanced diamonds, but I do think people should understand the difference – esp because it can make a big difference in price or how you negotiate.  Diamond jewelry can be a very big expense so I just try to educate people about the realities of the market and how these technical things like color grading worK, so they don’t get taken advantage of or pay too much. (Because we all can get carried away by the beauty and sparkle – and that’s what jewelry sales people count on.)

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