(Closed) What is the most interesting/unique ceremony tradition you’ve heard of?

posted 9 years ago in Beehive
Post # 3
Member
7082 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2009

Hi!  Hopefully you’ve found some interesting traditions that you can share with us as well!  The hard thing about traditions is that they’ve been done before (a lot).  That’s why they are traditions 🙂

We think we’ll be going with the keepsake box with wine and love letters, but rather than opening it when we’re having marital trouble, we’ll open it on anniversaries.  Other than that, I am very interested in handfasting type traditions as well.

Hope that helps.

Post # 4
Member
1276 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

I don’t know if these are traditions, but:

A couple told me a cute thing their officiant suggested.  Rather than writing their own vows (though I suppose it could be in addition to that), they wrote each other letters that the officiant read out loud during the ceremony.  Neither one knew what the other wrote beforehand.  They then used more traditional vows.

My sister and BIL asked each of us in the wedding party to say a wish or blessing for them.  I think we each lit a floating candle and put it in a hurricane vase after saying it, can’t recall.  even though they had like 6 people on each side, it was pretty fast and very sweet.  Esp. b/c we spanned a wide range of ages and experience (my bro was like 13 and then they had some GM’s who’d been married for almost 10 years).

The Irish hand binding ceremony is kinda neat.  My Fiance is mostly Irish descent, but I’m not sure if we’re going to do it or not.

Hindu and Jewish traditions both include some kind of seven steps.  I know more about the Hindu one…which involves walking around a fire seven times while some element of the bride and grooms clothes are tied together.

http://www.indiaweddingplanner.com/indian-wedding-customs/seven-vows.html

My cousin’s husband’s family tradition is to only do five at the wedding.  The sixth is done after 1 year of marriage, the 7th after your first kid.  There’s something kind of nice about how it demonstrates that becoming "married" is an ongoing process that takes time and experience.

I don’t really expect you’d do those things exactly, but other cultural traditions might be a good place to look for ideas that resonate with you that can be modified to your ceremony.

Post # 5
Member
2820 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2013

Ooh! I have been looking at these too! =)

1) Handfasting: You and your betrothed clasp hands (fingers intertwined), and the officiant ties a knot around your hands/wrist. This is where the phrase "tying the knot" comes from. It symbolizes unity and your commitment to each other. Most people untie the knot right away, or when the ceremony ends, but you can also leave it on (I read somewhere that when it first started, you kept it on for a week — this was like your honeymoon — and if you decided you didn’t want to be together you "cut" the knot, whereas if you did want to be together, at the end of the trial period you untied it together while an officiant witnessed).

2) Jumping the broom: You and your FH/W hold hands and jump over a broom (lying on the ground) together. I’ve heard that it’s Pagan, and I’ve also heard (from Miss. Swan) that it’s African-American. Basically, this one symbolizes starting a new life together (with a clean slate).

3) Unity candle/sand ceremony: I’m sure you know all about this one. I know it’s not particularly original, but I love it all the same. =) Basically, the mothers of the bride and groom light two separate candles/fill two jars with sand (different colours), and then the bride & groom light a single candle together using the B&G candles (or pour the sand into a larger jar). Symbolizes unity, two lives coming together, etc.

4) Quilt wrapping: This isn’t so much a tradition (because, as far as I know, only Sara and Matt of <span class=”Apple-style-span” style=”text-decoration: underline”>2000dollarwedding.com have ever done it), but they had family & friends send them fabric scraps and they made a quilt which they were then wrapped (together) in by their officiant at their wedding, symbolizing how the love and warmth of others would nurture and strengthen them together.

5) Love letters & wine: You each write a letter to each other (about how/why you fell in love with the person) and seal it, then place the letters and a bottle of wine (or whatever you want) in a box. You’re supposed to open the box, share the wine, and read the letters if you ever have marital strife, but like doctorgirl said, you can choose to open it on anniversaries, if you’d prefer. 

6) Love letters/writing your own vows: Some people do traditional vows but write a love letter to each other the morning of, and read that before they have the ceremony. Some people write their own vows. Some people do both. =)

7) Tell stories/anecdotes: I’ve heard two that I really love. One is similar to the "love letters & wine" in that any time that you’re having marital strife, each partner is supposed to present a single red rose to the other, to symbolize that they still love each other and will work together to get through the hard times. The other is just a funny story to do for a reading: a wife commits to making a doily each time her husband makes her mad, and one day he’s looking through the attic and finds a box with a single doily in it, and he feels pretty good about himself — until his wife tells him that she sold all the other doilies, and made $XXX (large amount of money) off of them, because the doilies were taking up too much room! =D

8) Jumping the fire: Similar to jumping the broom, only you jump over a small fire/bed of coals. 

Fell free to come up with your own traditions. As always, whatever has meaning to YOU should be incorporated. =) 

Post # 6
Member
400 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

We took this from a friend who got married a few years ago, and we used it at our wedding a week ago.
After the processional, my husband and I walked back into the church and dismissed all our guests one-by-one. We hugged each of them and thanked them for coming. It was our way of NOT doing a receiving line. It was really sweet and we had a lot of people tell us they hadn’t seen it before and really liked it.

Post # 7
Member
883 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: April 2009

Well, this is certainly unique  – I made it up!  We did a water blending / ring dip and bless ceremony. I blogged about the background to it here:

http://masterpieceweddings.blogspot.com/2008/09/blogging-brides_30.html

Basically, water from places of significance to us, poured in a blended together, and then the rings dipped in it an blessed.

Post # 8
Member
735 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2009

This isn’t really unique but Flowers for Mary was the moment i remember most vividly

another one, thats not exactly "beautiful" is an irish tradition is the MOG throws a shoe over the brides head… pretty unique!

 

Post # 9
Member
209 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

Some of the things that Fiance and I are incorporating into our ceremony: We wrote the whole ceremony from start to finish, nothing about it is traditional. We are both literary geeks (he’s an English teacher & getting an MA in English–I’m a writer and getting an MFA in Creative Writing) so our vows are based on something we took from a book–it’s basically our officiant (friend) telling the story of how we met, of our relationship.

We have asked one of our friends to be our ring holder–she will greet our guests as they come in and will be holding both of our wedding bands. She will ask each guest to touch the rings and give them a personal blessing–our officiant is going to say something before the ring exchange about how our rings have been touched by all the hands that love us. And we are jumping the broom right after our kiss.

Post # 10
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I’ve mentioned this before on WB, but I really loved a bio by a girl on TheKnot (username: jbloom).  She had a "pants cutting" during her ceremony.  Basically, the officiant said the couple would now cut a pair of pants together to symbolize that they both shared the responsibility and power in the relationship.  Together they held up an old pair of jeans and cut up the middle with a pair of scissors.  I always thought that was really quirky and cute but also kind of sweet and sentimental.  🙂

Post # 11
Member
1064 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2009

We are going to have a worship team from my church play some of Fiance and I’s fave worship songs, and print the lyrics to them in the program so everyone can rock out with us and honor God with us before we make our commitment to each other and to our Lord!! I’m really excited about this and only some people know cause I’m sure from our non church going friends we will really hear it, but it’s our day and I plan on honoring my God before making my lifetime commitment! I’m really excited about it!

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