(Closed) What makes other countries education system better than the US?

posted 8 years ago in Legal
Post # 3
Member
4137 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

con- there’s no way to pay for it.

Post # 5
Member
608 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

Maybe I’m misunderstanding but this sounds like government student loans and grants to me.  You take the money to pay for your courses and defer payment until you have a job.  Doesn’t sound as seemless as their system but essentially the same idea. 

Post # 6
Member
4137 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@Miss Tattoo:considering republicans just unveiled a new plan for $30b in spending cuts and even the president cut the budget down to 2008 levels, no, i don’t think there’s a way to pay for a program like this at this point in time.

also, i’m not sure how it works in australia, but here schools are either private or state-owned. states are doing MUCH worse budget-wise than the federal government…just ask any state employee who has to take furloughs.

Post # 7
Member
5977 posts
Bee Keeper

@Snowy414: I agree – it sort of sounds like government loans with a little more freedom for you to pay it back on your own rather than getting it taken from your paycheck. It sounds like the garnishment process here in the US.

Post # 8
Member
1963 posts
Buzzing bee

Well we kinda already do with federal student loans (which are phased out if you take on certain puiblic interest jobs.

Post # 9
Member
3788 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I think there is a disconnect between your title and the content of your post.

Post # 10
Member
7975 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

@Miss Tattoo: Australia spends their annual budget so differently than the US though. I’m no expert, but based on headline browsing alone, I’d hazard to say we spend significantly more than they do on things like defense, weapons contracting/development, sending soldiers overseas, etc. (I base this solely on the fact that I don’t think I’ve ever heard of Australia being involved in any major international wars – could be totally wrong – whereas I know that the US is heavily involved in a lot of international affairs of many natures.)

Also, in the US we don’t have/make use of a lot of natural resources – soooo much is imported, whereas many other countries (no idea about Australia) are able to self sustain at a much higher level. That affects the way our national budget runs too (I can’t explain how, but I know it does – I’m terrible at economics!)

Those things are not inherently bad, but they are where our government chooses to funnel a lot of money. Ignoring our increasing national debt, there’s only so much money to divide up into different directions. 🙂

We also have a much higher population, which, while it means more people to tax, also means loads more students in college at any given time.

Post # 11
Member
2090 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Student loans do sort of work this way. You can have your loans deferred/forborne for economic hardship, which is a bit similar to the statement: “when you have a job and earn over a certain limit you pay it back.”. If you don’t make enough $ (not sure what the thresholds are, to be honest), you can defer your payments until you make more $. Many states also have student loan forgiveness for public sector service and teaching jobs.

Post # 13
Member
159 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I think the true downfall of the American education system is Americans. As an educator, the majority of students and parents have become apathetic to what goes on in the classroom. For most students there is sense of entitlement, that they shouldn’t have to actually work or learn and should be given the grade they want not earned.

Our society as a whole doesn’t value education.  Our nation has become comfortable being “top dog” and has let countries like China and Japan surpass us. In countries like China and Japan there is an expectation that their students will perform well in school. Also we should examine who our society idolizes. We glorify morons like Paris Hilton and the crew from Jersey Shore. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard things like people who like math and science are nerds and uncool. What messages does that send to our children?

In Europe, they have what is called a tracking system, where students are tracked into University and trade schools. I won’t go into whether I agree or disagree with this concept, but it definitely has its benefits and disadvantages.

I won’t even go into the ridiculousness of the teacher credentialing process, and the way our teachers are undervalued and underpaid.

 

Post # 14
Member
690 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@Miss Steinbeck: I agree with a lot of what you said. And let’s not forget the massacre of the English language that goes on in everyday usage. As a lover of language and literature, it makes me sad to see the spelling and shortcuts people use. Everyone should be able to speak and write with some ability in their first language.

Post # 16
Member
3539 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Speaking as an aussie that went through the HECS system.

To send your kid to Primary school (years 1 -7) & High School (years 8-12) at a public school it is a fee of about $400 for each year sometimes less in a public school. I attended a private school from Years 8-12 which we had to private school fees ranging from 7000- 15000 a year. I boarded for my Years 11 & 12.

When we finish school at 17 we sit a TEE exam. A tertiery entrance and you have to get a certain score to enter each course at university.

You are then given two options on recieving admission from your chosen university. One.. you pay each semester as you go or two… you take the HECS system.

The HECS system is where you go to uni.. acrue a debt.. (my course ended up being in the high 20k for me to complete my degree) and then after you finish your study and you go get yourself a job you pay your degree off. It comes off in your pay packet and goes to the government.

Ive managed to pay mine off and Im now debt free. but I know some people take about 20 years to pay it off. Its so that we dont fall behind the poverty income line and that everyone can get a chance to go to university. Its such a good system.

 

@ddw: Umm about the war sitcho.. we are involved in the Iraq war..  so far 22 australian soldiers have died . I guess you might see it against the population comparison that there are more americans. we have been involved since day dot there are australian soldiers serving over there at the moment.

Another good thing about australia is the medicare system. If you are a public patient and not under private health care you will still be given care for free. The reason why people in australia that have private health care is for high risk surgery and to have their own private room in hospital, also it bumps you up the list a little quicker however no one is denied because of health care.

I go to the doctor and it costs me $62 to see the quack. I pay the amount. I then go produce my reciept at the medicare office and they give me 30.00 back.. It also works for medication if you pay for a certain amount you can go claim that back also. So you dont end up dirt poor just because your sick. Great subsidy system.

umm also if your looking at this and going damn thats alot of money the employment system is a little differant. They have what they call and award rate for each job. So there is a min that an employer has to pay you if you pays you below the award rate they can face  fines and court action.  So this raises the bar on the poverty line also.

 

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