(Closed) What to do about a lazy co-worker

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
1427 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - parent's backyard

How long has she been getting away with it? Honestly, I would stay out of it. Your higher-ups should take notice eventually. If you rat her out, then it’s possible you’ll be seen as a whiner.

The only thing I can think of is maybe going to your manager to talk about your overtime. That might prompt him/her to take notice of your co-worker’s slack. 

I know it sucks, but that’s how it goes. 

Post # 5
Member
2691 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I would approach it from the position of, “It’s making it more difficult for me to accomplish my work and I don’t want the company to suffer because I’m overloaded.” Make sure you have specific instances in case they ask, but don’t bring them up unless they do ask.

Post # 6
Member
96 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

You have two options.

1) Collect evidence against her and take this to your boss (i.e be a “tattle tale” and risk being seen as a whiner).

2) Suck it up. If you do this, you will become more resentful and angry, and eventually all of your co-workers will pick up on this and most likely see you as the problem for being the “angry worker”. Remember most workers have a higher tolerance for slackers with happy personalities than they do for angry co-workers who are actually productive.

So basically, DO SOMETHING CONSTRUCTIVE or DO NOTHING

Post # 7
Member
1177 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Is there an actual manager who assigns tasks? I’m wondering why that person hasn’t noticed that Sally doesn’t do the tasks assigned to her. Also, is there a reason you’re finishing her workload? I can’t be sure but it sounds like you’re covering for her instead of allowing her to fail.

Post # 8
Member
3028 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@QueenofCups:  +1

I had a similiar situation way back in the day, but at a non-career job and was really nervous how to approach it.  I did just what was suggested; created a brief list of specific incidents in which my boss was not doing his job and it fell on me and noted the lack of fairness in the work place.  Boss was fired a week later, after the board members went into the office a few days, asked around and found what I said to be true.  

Think from a bosses perspective what would be the worst part to mention to them- probably lying on time sheets and taking credit for other’s work.

Post # 9
Member
3028 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@geekspice:  Per @nerdybird:  Our bosses don’t work in our office since we’re contract, so they’ll never notice it.  

She also mentions they work on a team, so if OP doesn’t do the slackers work a project wouldn’t get done- which would fall on the entire team.

Post # 10
Member
652 posts
Busy bee

@AnonBeeLee:  document everything! You and your coworker should document her behavior. 

Post # 11
Member
4495 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I work with a similar person. She sits and does nothing all day while the rest of us work our butts off. She sits at her desk all day online. One day she was on the phone for 2 hours disputing a 9 cent charge on her credit card! Literally! We’re all doing overtime and she claims it as well, but hardly gets ANYthing done for the hours she claims. So many people have complained about her, but she has been working there for 30 years and her and our boss kind of grew up together – used to go out to bars together, parties, etc. He does call her into the office, but nothing ever changes. We’re federal employees and as such it is almost impossible to get fired Undecided

Post # 12
Member
1177 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@aliciapdx:  I got that part, but regardless of whether they’re in her office, it seems odd that there isn’t someone remotely managing and assigning them tasks and projects, keeping track of who’s working on what. I’ve managed a lot of teams and if there’s no leader, it quickly devolves into chaos. 

Post # 15
Member
1427 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010 - parent's backyard

LOL, I have no idea what law firms are like, so I don’t know if these tactics would even work:

1. a slow, sneaky way: if you all contribute to a “pile” of work, what if you suggested signing your name on each finished task, and each have your own separate folder to keep them in?  You could frame it as “just in case one of us makes a mistake, you know who is is accountable“. or something like that. 

2. If you work for a place that has billable hours, do you keep detailed time tracking sheets? do they just all get lumped together between the three of you? Maybe you could figure out a way to suggest that separating them would be a good idea for the company. 

3. Do you get paid extra for overtime? of course money loss for the company is always a major motivator. you could lead with that. Only then if they ask why you think you have to log overtime, you could bring up your co-worker. 

 

Post # 16
Member
9139 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

If she is lying on her hours, especially overtime hours, the company can get in big trouble.  I would find a polite way to let them know that she is being less than honest about her hours.  Maybe film her in the workplace.  Make sure the third person is on your side solidly before getting management involved.

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