(Closed) What type of dog flea medication do you use?

posted 9 years ago in Pets
  • poll: What type of dog flea medication do you use?

    topical

    oral

    other

    none

  • Post # 18
    Member
    5147 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    Usually none. I prefer to put chemicals on my dogs and little as possible. We’ve never had a problem with fleas. I do keep some on-hand just in case. I use Frontline Plus if I board them or take them to someone’s house I know has had trouble with fleas. That’s only about 1-2 times a year.

    Don’t use flea collars, it’s like poison around your pet’s neck, some pets have extreme reactions and lose their hair and have sores all around their neck. And they don’t work, the fleas just avoid the neck and still are present on other parts of the dog’s body.

     

    Side note: I also don’t do monthly heartworm year-round. They get heartworm medicine (I hesitate to use the word “preventative” because it really is a “treatment”, it kills any baby heartworms) 2-3 times throughout the summer, that’s all. For the heartworm lifecycle to even take place in the mosquito, it needs to be over 57 degrees day & night for about a month and a half.

    Post # 19
    Member
    7691 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: August 2010

    We use Frontline for both. Our dog has never had fleas. Our cats had fleas but they were not on frontline at the time. Once they were on frontline the fleas went away and have not been back! Revolution is said to be the best but you cant get it at Petco/Petsmart you have to get it through your vet

    Post # 20
    Member
    4369 posts
    Honey bee

    View original reply
    @abbyful: I’m interested in the heartworm preventative you are using for your dogs. What is it called?

    Post # 21
    Member
    3525 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    I use topical Advantage. The streak is annoying but usually I put it on her in the morning before we leave for work and just put a blanket over the couch. Then at night we just throw the blankets in the wash not a big deal.

    I tried the oral Advantage flea + heartworm combo for 6 months and I did not like it. I didn’t feel like she reacted well to you so the cost savings (the reason why we tried it) wasn’t worth it to me.

    ETA: We keep her on Interceptor (heartworm) meds year round. If we don’t we have to test her yearly so the cost savings of not putting her on it monthly washes with the testing, imo. And it gives us piece of mind. And she thinks heartworm pills are a treat! hahah.

    Post # 22
    Member
    2820 posts
    Sugar bee

    We use frontline from spring to fall (and don’t put anything on in the winter).  If we don’t we find ticks on them and I really don’t want to deal with lyme’s disease again.  Our first dog came to us with it and it was horrible dealing with it.  We found grocery store brands didn’t work very well and flea collars did diddly squat.

    Post # 23
    Member
    365 posts
    Helper bee

    My dog is allergic to fleas, so its important to keep him flea free.  Last summer, at the house we were living at, we had a huuuuge infestation.  I sent my dog to live with my mom while we got rid of them.  Except, we never could get rid of them.  I tried everything.  We had a cat and a dog still living with us.  I did topicals, dips, baths, collars.  Sprayed the yard, the furniture, the carpet, used powders in the yard and carpet, bombs.  You name it and we did it.  We bagged up clothes and pillows and blankets to kill them.  We COULD NOT get rid of them!!

    When we moved last October, my vet gave me a pill for them to take which kills all of the fleas and is effective for 24 hours.  So I gave my cat the pill, and then gave him a bath immediately before bringing him over to our new place.  The pill worked wonderfully, but my cat seemed to have an awful reaction to it.  For about an hour after I gave it to him, he ran around the house like he was on fire.  I picked him up and his heart was racing.  He settled down after that, so I guess either the pill made him have a reaction or the fleas were all biting him at once.

    My vet also switched us from Frontline to Vector.  There has been a problem in my area with fleas becoming immune to Frontline, which is probably how it got so bad in the first place, other than fleas were just awful here last summer.  Vector does the trick for them now.  Everything we couldn’t sanitize for the move, we left in unheated storage over the winter, which would kill the fleas when it freezes.  I haven’t begun getting it out yet, so hopefully it will be okay!

    ETA: Vector makes my pets much less greasy than Frontline did.

    Post # 24
    Member
    4544 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    Frontline…topical.

    Post # 25
    Member
    5147 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    @SoupyCat – I use Tri-Heart Plus (Ivermectin).

    Side note for collie owners: collies shouldn’t be given Ivermectin because they are genetically predisposed to have much higher incident of reactions to it.

    Post # 27
    Member
    1033 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2010

    View original reply
    @twentyeleven: My dogs have been on Trifexis for three months now. So far so good, we are definitely happy with it.

    Post # 29
    Member
    336 posts
    Helper bee

    View original reply
    @JessesGirl: Awesome, good to know someone else likes it. 🙂 

    View original reply
    @abbyful: It is true that collies and others in the breed family are Ivermectin sensitive; however, it doesn’t apply as much to heartworm prevention as it does to high-dose, off-label use of the drug. Ivermectin is in many heartworm preventatives and they are tested in these breeds at much, much higher doses than is given in a single monthly pill and deemed safe. The risk is so low that in general it is not a problem. You really would be better off advising people to speak to their vet if they have any concerns, not warning them away or giving advice as to what they should/shouldn’t do. 

    Also, due to the prevalence of heartworm across the US, the American Heartworm Society and most vets now recommend year-round prevention; this is also something that should be determined directly between the pet owner and the vet. (Sorry OP to go off topic, just thought that should be noted).

    Post # 30
    Member
    5147 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    @twentyeleven – Most collie owners/breeders I know feel “better safe than sorry”, especially since there are several alternatives out there, there’s really no reason to have to give Ivermectin to a collie. http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?aid=580

    My vet (I live in Kansas City) doesn’t even recommend year-round heartworm treatment.

    Heartworm is transmitted by mosquito, there is no reason to be giving preventative year-round in the majority of the USA. For example, there is zero chance a dog in Kansas will contract heartworms in December. Due to the lifecycle of the parasite, there’s only actually a couple months that even really have possible transmission in most of the USA.

    For most of the USA, the only benefit to year-round heartworm medicine is lining the veterinary pharmaceuticals manufacturer’s pockets.

    Good blog entry on heartworm preventative, that coincides with my own individual research and conversations with my vet too: http://terriermandotcom.blogspot.com/2008/05/billion-dollar-heartworm-scam.html

    Post # 31
    Member
    336 posts
    Helper bee

    I am extremely familiar with heartworm; I am a vet tech and I live in NC where it is a severe problem. I guess we will have to agree to disagree. That is not what we recommend in my region, obviously, and while it depends on your area, like I mentioned previously AHS and others recommend year-round prevention. But I respect the time and research you have put into it and this is why I think everyone should determine what is best for them personally on their own accord and working with their vet. 

    And there are other alternatives so yes, there is no reason to HAVE to use an ivermectin based product. But I personally have no clients who go out of their way to use an alternate product when the testing and research shows it is safe. 

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