"What would you do?" political question

posted 2 years ago in Legal
Post # 62
Member
1117 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

“What would you do?”

I would mind my business.

As for not being friends for someone who breaks the law- not all illegals break the law per se. If they came here as children, it is illegal for them to stay. BUT- they can not get a US passport, as they are not US citizens, they can not get a passport from their country because they are not in their country, and it is illegal to cross the US border without a passport. So I would not judge someone for failure to preform physically impossible feats. (In addition to the fact that if this is the only country they’ve ever known, it doesn’t make a hell of alot of sense to send them to what is essentially a foreign country.)

Post # 63
Member
23 posts
Newbee

Well in texas they just catch and release them anyway so not only would there be no point it would overall be a really dumb experience

Post # 64
Member
636 posts
Busy bee

mrstodd2bee :  Those are some pretty sensationalized pieces. He’s not “cracking down” on immigration. He’s referring to asylum seekers, and he’s advising potential border jumpers to familiarize themselves with Canadian rules. Immigration is alive and well in Canada and always will be. 

Post # 65
Member
2413 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

daisy123 :  Ah. But we’re not talking about legal immigration, but rather illegal immigrants. Big difference. There are around 33 million legal immigrants in the USA. And around 11 million illegal immigrants. The USA grants legal immigration to about 1 million people each year.

Compare that to Canada at about 300,000. 

Post # 66
Member
1180 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

impatient1 :  Kind of outside the point of the thread, but foreign nationals can get a passport issued at their consulate.  Worked with a chick that had to do that. 

Post # 67
Member
1180 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

glitzy :  Catch & Release, formal US Policy.  😁

Post # 68
Member
7732 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

So many scenarios paint illegal immigration as a hardworking family in the neighborhood that just wants a better life- and sometimes that is the case. But not always. I’ll tell you a personal story that does affect my thinking on the subject. 

In 1987 we moved to San Diego and lived in a middle class suburb at the base of a small mountain. I was 10 and played with many of the kids in the neighborhood. I quickly learned that the hills weren’t safe to go exploring in- tales of vicious dogs and rumors of marijuana growers and secrets “camps” with men living in the hills.

Well one night some of the men in one of the camps got into a drunken fight and stabbed each other. One of the men ran down from the hills and into our house covered in blood seeking assistance for his injuries. My parents called 911 and the paramedics took the man and quickly law enforcement swarmed the hills and raided the marijuana farm and rounded up the immigrants who were being housed in ramshackle encampments on the hillside. 

Obviously this was a long time ago- marijuana is now legal in CA, and there is a greater emphasis on human trafficking- which in hindsight is clearly what was happening with the men up in the hills. This was a stopover after they had been moved across the boarder. My parents never called the authorities until the night the man ran into their house bloodied. But if I were an adult in the same circumstances today I sure as shit would have called and reported the situation. I have no doubt that many of those poor men on the hillside were seeking a better life. But if people are being trafficked and there is criminal activity going on I wouldn’t hesitate.

Now that being said, if it was a nice family living down the street just minding their own business and living peacefully- I would never call and repot a situation like that. I think it’s a complicated issue and people forget that there are dangerous elements to it that put not only the public, but the immigrants themselves at risk.

Post # 70
Member
7419 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

karen12 :  supporting documentation might be an issue. Many of these people were born at home, not in hospitals, in nations where record-keeping systems were very primitive at the time. City Halls may have been destroyed in natural disasters or civil wars. So, like  everything else in this process, this might not be as easy for everyone as it sounds. El Salvador is not going  to give you a passport till you can prove you were born in El Salvador.

Post # 71
Member
436 posts
Helper bee

mrstodd2bee :  Good luck to Trudeau with that. /s

As far as i knew, most deportations we hear of are for people charged with actual crimes or people who overstayed and fought deportation in court and lost for whatever reason and those who lied to get in (false information for VISA). I remember this case of a Sikh man hiding out in a temple after he lost his court appeal and basically the cops took YEARS to drum up the legal authority to remove him from his sanctuary. This was in the early 2000s.

 

That being said, having done some brief reading…we’ve gotten a lot less sympathetic. 

 

Between January 2014 and Sept. 6, 2017, Canada sent 249 people to 11 countries for which the government had suspended or deferred deportations because of dangers to civilians.

That includes 134 people to Iraq, 62 to the Democratic Republic of Congo and 43 to Afghanistan, the data shows.

 

And nearly half of Canadians (who responded to this particular poll anyway) want to deport those who cross over illegally from the USA.

 

🙁

Post # 72
Member
267 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2018

arosebyanyothername :  I was lurking to see if someone would. You never know with some of these bees. 

 

happyispretty90 :  to answer your question .. NOPE. My mother was an illegal (now she’s legal & it took FOREVER).  

Post # 73
Member
1581 posts
Bumble bee

Disgusting.  I absolutely would not.  People are entitled assholes.  They should be thanking their lucky stars that they were born here and not somewhere else, and be helping others to have the same gifts they’ve been given.  And I do, I volunteer with an immigration rights law firm.  

Post # 74
Member
23 posts
Newbee

@karen12 its still practiced in texas

 

Post # 75
Member
257 posts
Helper bee

KittyYogi :   exactly my point!!!! 

Plus karma is a bitch if you do something bad to make other suffer it will come back to you at some point. 

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