What's NOT in the news – that you think should be?

posted 2 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 16
Member
5121 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

JsDragonfly :  Ugh. I see so many stupid HOA stories and it’s always the same thing where the HOA is enforcing their rules and people don’t like it in that particular circumstance and want to act like the HOA is against that certain thing.  I know HOAs are annoying, but these stories are just stupid.

fromatoz :  Agreed on the science thing. It seems like most of the “science” stories that are featured are fluff pieces about studies done on coffee or chocolate which hype up their findings into some catchy headline (what started out as a study showing that caffeine use is correlated with a decreased risk of developing Alzheimers is now “Coffee Prevents Alzheimer’s, Drink all the Coffee!”). The quality of reporting on science is horrible for the most part and I think it creates a distrust and misunderstanding of the scientific community. 

Post # 18
Member
674 posts
Busy bee

Animal testing and animal cruelty. It is horrific to see how many companies most people buy from daily test on animals. We have gone cruelty free this past year and I feel so much butter using products that I know poor animals didn’t have to suffer/die for me to use them.

Post # 20
Member
561 posts
Busy bee

sugarcloud :  The number one killer of women is their male boyfriend/intimate partner/domestic partner/husband. Not just men, but their intimate partner. And black and native American women are disproportionately more likely to get murdered.

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/21/538518569/cdc-half-of-all-female-murder-victims-are-killed-by-intimate-partners

Carolsays :  That really depends on where you are. Overpopulation is not a concern in the developed world, rather the opposite is (and declining fertility rates).

fromatoz :  To be honest, I really dislike how medical and scientific advancements are covered in the news. A lot of times, it’s irresponsible and shockingly bad journalism. That’s why you can find articles that say scientific studies justify practically everything.

e.g. https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/05/28/410313446/why-a-journalist-scammed-the-media-into-spreading-bad-chocolate-science

Post # 23
Member
9610 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2016

Journalists seem to have zero clue how to cover anything scientific. So even the things that do get covered they get wrong or over-sensationalize anway. We need journalists who actually understand science and research to be covering those issues. And morning “news” shows should just stop talking about “science” altogether with thier “coffee cures cancer” “red wine makes you lose weight” “ dairy will kill you” nonsense. None of the studies they talk about are ever making the claim they are saying.

Post # 24
Member
2401 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

I disregard most journalism at this point. None of it is without bias and it is all heavily editorialized. None of it is honest and without a slant. I don’t want to have to track 3 or 4 different news feeds to try to piece together some semblance of truth by filtering out the bias in reporting. Shameful. BBC America, as far as I can tell, is the most reliable news agency & hasn’t  (yet) bastardized their reporting like all the others. I’m American and live in the U.S.A. 

Post # 25
Member
5121 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

goodasitgets :   hikingbride :  At a conference recently, I attended a science communication panel that was meant to provide ideas on how to communicate your research to a lay audience. One of the panelists was a science journalist from the Washington Post. It was actually very informative and explained some of the efforts that are underway to improve science communication. I’m hoping this was indicative of a step in the right direction.

Post # 26
Member
1364 posts
Bumble bee

Carolsays :  Yes on State and local government news.  I stay abreast of all that by following it in social media, being on email lists of my state legislators and attending town meetings with them but it would be great if local tv news covered it.  That is where many of my less modern family members get information.  And they just aren’t getting much information from it.  I can’t even watch my local news, it’s absurd.  Mostly sensational fear mongering & viral nonsense. 

Post # 27
Member
1364 posts
Bumble bee

SithLady :  I get a lot of my science info from podcasts which I think is a great format for a lay person because it’s conversational.  It’s expanded on in ways that are easier to grasp than a print story that just delivers information in a more raw way.  

Post # 28
Member
5121 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

wildflowerz :  I agree. Podcasts are great! I also like that my NPR station does a regular segment that highlights research going on at the local university, it’s always informative, not sensationalized and easy to understand. 

Post # 29
Member
7412 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

The worldwide financial crisis that will be led by the US and caused largely by people retiring without enough money.

Most people don’t have a guaranteed pension any more.  They’ve been replaced by 401(k)s which are self-directed, meaning people have to opt in, which few people do— it takes money away from “today” — and wages didn’t really go up to reflect that, when pensions got converted to 401(k).  Few people actually know what their 401(k) money is invested in.  most of today’s 401(k)’s are invested in mutual funds, which in turn are mostly stocks, which  can gain or lose a lot of value quickly.

According to Forbes, the average 65-year-old has around $175k saved for retirement— but this number is misleading, because half of Americans don’t even have $1, so that means  a lot of people who have nothing saved, and a few people who have a lot. Plus even if every American had the full $175k saved at retirement age, that’s not enough money to retire. you could draw about $7k/year from your 401(k) starting at age 65 if you didn’t want to completely run out of money. When added to Social Security, it’s simply not enough money to live on, unless you have another source of income.

Retirees are returning to the workforce, often taking minimum wage/entry level jobs that would historically have gone to younger workers. This in turn increases unemployment for young people.  And it is only going to get worse, because nearly 40% of today’s retirees still have traditional pensions. Not eveyrone is broke yet.

Why should we be making a big deal of this?

An entire country running out of income is going to be a very big problem, and when it’s an economic powerhouse like the US, it will be a worldwide problem.

It takes decades to  solve long-term financial problems like this; so we should already be shaping our education, infrastructure, and social services policies on these facts (because really we should not be the kind of nation where old people die homeless or where grannies work at the local Wendy’s because they need the money). We should also be basing our immigration policies on the need for a constantly growing workforce, which we can at this point only get through immigration (because so many couples are choosing to have only 1 kid or even 0 kids due to the cost, we do not have enough people to pay into social security to keep it viable).

 

Post # 30
Member
747 posts
Busy bee

Acts of terrorism that happen in other countries. Hands down This actually upsets me so much.

A bomb goes off in a market in Syria killing hundreds of people and nobody bats an eye. Someone kills two people here in a purposeful car run down and people lose their minds. 

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