(Closed) What's The Highest You Will Let Your Heart Rate Go? HR Monitor Questions

posted 6 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
5001 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

Ok, not sure I can help much but I am a runner and a lot of people do HR training so I’m fairly familiar. My resting HR is really low, like under 40. When I run I’m usually around 130 and could easily hold a conversation (this is thought to be the “fat burning zone” but that’s a loose label). The highest I’ve ever seen my HR was 180 when I was running straight up a mountain. 

Finding out your resting heart rate would probably be beneficial. Do it when you haven’t worked out recently and aren’t worked up or anything and just sit/lie down for a few minutes until it gets as low as it will. Then you can use it for something like this:

http://www.uniquephysiquepersonaltraining.com/body_tools_thr.html

Post # 5
Member
464 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I trained off of lactic threshhold when I was racing bicycles.  I used a book written by an Ironman Triathlete to chart zones and all that.

The 220-age is based on WW II techonology.

Post # 7
Member
5001 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

@ChuckNorris:  I’ve always heard a loose definition that lactic threshold is just above (as in harder than) what you could hold for a half marathon. So in HR terms, it’s higher than your fat burning zone but not an all-out sprint. Honestly, I wouldn’t worry about it, it’s not something that most people know about or use for fitness/weight loss. 

How long are you able to exercise with your HR at 170-180? I don’t think it matters if your HR is too high, unless you are cutting your workout shorter because you’re too tired from the high HR. You may benefit from lowering your HR a little and doing longer workouts on some days. You can change it up- do some intervals one day and a slower, longer workout another day. 

PS when I’m at the Dr my pulse is a lot higher too!! 

Post # 10
Member
464 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

Ah, found the book which describe what I’m talking about:  The Sally Edwards Heart Rate Monitor Guidebook to Heart Zone Training.  I used an earlier edition of this book to train after meeting her at a cycling event.

I enjoyed some success with it, but mostly I remember learning that going all-out all the time doesn’t yield the greatest rewards.

The topic ‘What's The Highest You Will Let Your Heart Rate Go? HR Monitor Questions’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors