(Closed) What's your recessional song?

posted 6 years ago in Catholic
  • poll: What's your recessional song?
    Wedding March : (5 votes)
    33 %
    Allegro Maestros : (1 votes)
    7 %
    Other, please specify below : (9 votes)
    60 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    250 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    Cannon in D Major by Pachebel 🙂

    Post # 4
    Member
    3375 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: October 2011

    We weren’t allowed to do the wedding march 🙁 Something about Mendelssohn being an anti semite!

    Post # 5
    Member
    571 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    Our string quartet is doing Viva La Vida!

    Post # 6
    Member
    1513 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    was the wedding march a choice she gave you? when we got some info from a catholic church we were looking into getting married at, it said the wedding march/here comes the bride were not permitted because they were secular and diverted focus from god, etc etc

    some churches are stricter than others so you may not have that issue, just a heads up!

    Post # 8
    Member
    3697 posts
    Sugar bee

    There are two “Wedding Marches” out there that sometimes raise red flags in Catholic churches:

    Wagner was the anti-Semite, and his piece (real title is “Bridal Chorus” from the opera Lohengrin – the one everyone thinks of as “Here Comes the Bride”) is pretty universally frowned upon. It’s also usually used as a processional rather than a recessional. From Wikipedia: ” In the opera, the chorus is sung after the ceremony by the women of the wedding party, as they accompany the heroine Elsa to the bridal chamber. In addition, the marriage between Elsa and Lohengrin is an almost immediate failure. While the song is traditionally associated with positive emotions, during weddings, within the context of the play it occurs before several guests are murdered. The “Bridal Chorus” is seldom played at Jewish weddings. This is often because of cultural objections, due to Wagner’s well-documented and public reputation as an antisemite. It is also opposed by many pastors of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod because of pre-First World War Lutheran opposition to the theater and to the pagan elements of Wagner’s operas.… The Roman Catholic Church generally does not use the “Bridal Chorus”; one diocese’s guidelines regarding the piece states that the chorus is a secular piece of music, that it is not a processional to the altar in the opera, and especially that its frequent use in film and television associate it with sentimentality rather than worship.

    Mendelssohn’s Wedding March is from an opera (A Midsummer Night’s Dream), and the scene in which it takes place is a little, eh, inappropriate from the Church’s standpoint, so many (but not all) Catholic churches don’t like to use it. It is more frequently used as a recessional.

    The Canon in D that a PP mentioned isn’t usually used as a recessional, it’s probably the most frequently-used processional at all weddings these days, Catholic or otherwise. (BTW – FutureMrs.Richards, if you reread this post, just wanted to let you know to proofread your programs, it’s “canon” in D and not “cannon”)

    We haven’t finalized our recessional yet, but “Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee”/Ode to Joy is a strong contender. It’s very traditional and Catholic church-wedding appropriate!

    Post # 9
    Member
    385 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    I believe Mendelssohn’s Wedding March and Handel’s Allegro Maestoso from Water Music are both secular pieces, not religious.  I think they both make good recessionals, though.

    We’re having the third movement from Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 as ours.  I’ve always loved playing and listening to that piece, and I wanted something that doesn’t get played for every wedding.

    Post # 10
    Member
    873 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2010

    Not Catholic, but married in a very conservative ceremony, and Wedding March wasn’t allowed.  The reason given was that it was secular, but we chose Hornpipe from Water Music, which was ok.

    Post # 11
    Member
    3697 posts
    Sugar bee

    @JenniferG:  Brandenburg Concerto – great pick! And, yes, definitely not overused. Wink

    Re. Mendelssohn and Handel both being “secular” music – yes, technically they are, in the sense that they are non-religious. However, non-religious classical music can be divided into two further categories: “secular” music that has some kind of connotation based on the context in occurs in, that the Church objects to (i.e. an opera where the characters commit adultery, or someone is kidnapped and forced into a marriage against her will, or the work has a clear anti-clerical theme, etc.) and “neutral” music that doesn’t really have any loaded context behind it. The two wedding marches fall into the former category while Handel’s “Water Music” is an example of the latter.

    Whether or not it matters in any given parish kind of depends on how big a music geek the priest or the organist/choir director/music director happens to be. Tongue Out

    Post # 12
    Member
    3078 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    Our Big Band is playing “Mahna Mahna” (The muppet song!)  I’m retarded.

     

    Post # 14
    Member
    3078 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @KCKnd2:  It’s in an old theatre, which is guess makes anything Muppet more appropriate!

    Post # 15
    Member
    3697 posts
    Sugar bee

    @Brideonabudgetlauren:  That is the perfect recessional in the perfect venue, then!!! HAHAHAH!!! It would never fly in a Catholic church, which is why I was a little confused (this is in the Catholic board) but it sounds awesome for a wedding in an antique theatre! Too funny!

    Post # 16
    Member
    3078 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: October 2012

    @KCKnd2:  OMG, I’m so oblivious.  I didn’t mean to thread jack!  I got excited and just wanted to post about mine lol Embarassed

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