(Closed) When is the best time to neuter a dog?

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 47
Member
17 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2014

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@MrsPanda99:  Dogs get LOST ALL THE TIME! People rarely intend for it to happen, but it does. They slip out of collars. They get spooked by fireworks. They chase after other pets. Dogs gets stolen. Please do not ever make the assumption that your dog won’t escape or get lost. Would you make that same assumption if you were talking about a child?

 

Post # 50
Member
17 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’m just going to say it, and I’m going to get flagged and flamed.

 

You’re not a responsible dog owner if you don’t neuter or spay.

 

Post # 51
Member
5540 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

… Accidents are called accidents because no one intends for them to happen. And dominance issues will be seriously helped by neutering. Your intact dog is dog aggressive and a large breed with potentially seriously harmful jaws,  are you prepared for what might happen if he attacks someone else’s dog?  Or child? Especially for a male dog,  castration is incredible simple,  heck,  most farm animals are castrated with minimal pain reduction and live fine and happy lives. 

Post # 52
Member
4369 posts
Honey bee

I would wait a year for male dogs. that’s what our vet recommends to stave off bone problems, not just necessarily cancer. 

Post # 53
Member
3658 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2000

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@angelmarrys:  There is the social concept of what is best for the community, and there is the concept of what is best for each individual animal. If you can’t recognize and respect the 2nd concept, you can’t participate in this discussion with reasonable points.

I have had pets for 45+ years. I have never, ever–not once–bred a cat or dog. There are too many homeless animals around to do that and I’ve not interested in contributing to that problem. I’ve taken in homeless cats and dogs for decades, I’ve NEVER had a puppy, the kittens I’ve had were born to feral mothers. I say this to establish my credentials in this conversation.: I. Do. Not. Breed.

But guess what, I’ve got unneutered animals in my home! Believe it or not, there are all kinds of health risks for anesthesia. My first responsibility is to the pets to whom I’ve made a committment. I’m not about to put them through surgery risk in order to satisfy some  one-size-fits-all community standard.

 

 

 

Post # 54
Member
3196 posts
Sugar bee

Didn’t your breeder sell you your boxer puppy under a contract that states you must neuter (I’m guessing this because it doesn’t sound like you show him)? If they didn’t, that would suggest that you dog isn’t from the best bloodlines anyway and that they don’t care about the health and future of the puppies they are selling and you are already at higher risk for health problems. But then again, maybe you got him in some other siutation…

Post # 55
Member
3658 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2000

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@fvsoccer:  The best bulldog breeder I know  has in her contracts that pet owners will neuter the dog, but will do it between x and x months of age. I think the time period is 18 – 24 months, but I’m not certain. She wants the pet quality dogs netuered but she wants full maturity as well.

But if socialization problem come up, she would want to know that as well and might advise a different course.

That is a good point, the OP’s breeder should be advising her on this.

 

Post # 56
Member
1090 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I second/third whatever for doing it if only for social issues that can arise with OTHER dogs.  I got my baby from a super shady person who did not take care of any of her animals, so of course he wasn’t neutered (he was about 2 years old at the time).  He did not mark things, was not aggressive, etc.  But when I took him to the dog park, he was a target for so many dogs.  After getting him neutered this winter and taking him back to the dog park now, his social interaction with dogs there is SO MUCH BETTER.  His personality is no different at home, he is the same old pup as before 🙂 

 

I also second/third doing it for the health benefits, prostate/testicular problems are a much greater concern than whatever small risk *may* be encountered from neutering.  And actually, humans are “spayed/neutered” due to health problems, too.  Hysterectomies are performed extremely often, and even though a lot of the times the ovaries are left intact, they are taken out sometimes, too.  Males with prostate problems often take medicine to cause them to go into a “medically induced hypogonadal state,” which is a nice way of basically saying their testicles get shut down from making hormones that help to grow prostates and some tumors.

 

 The difference between dogs and humans is that our sex hormones are a big part of what makes us who we are, and since the gonads produce these sex hormones, they are left in at all possible.  If you have no ovaries as a female, you make hardly any estrogen which = no sex drive. Same with guys, if they didn’t have testicles, they would not produce testosterone, and they would have a really hard time having sexual intercourse.  Humans are sexual beings. Dogs are not…they don’t need sex hormones unless they actually need to breed.  That being said, if everyone got their ovaries removed when they were finished having kids, then that automatically eliminates their risk of ever getting ovarian cancer.  If all men got their testicles removed, they would never get testicular cancer and probably not prostate cancer either (number 2 killer of men for cancers).  It would actually make a lot of sense for humans to get spayed/neutered, but we don’t do it because we like to have sex with no intentions of producing children.  Not true for dogs, they will only mate if/when the conditions would be right to make offspring.  

 

Moral of the story: get your pup neutered.  It is much more beneficial for him in the long run 🙂

 

Post # 57
Member
9773 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

If he’s already having issues with dominance/aggression, then I personally would do it once he hits a year old. Neutering will not change his behavior necessarily, but it may tone it down a bit and help other dogs not to react to him as much. I’m guessing that would be the first suggestion from a lot of behavioral trainers.

Also, neutering early generally makes a dog slightly taller and maybe a bit more gangly – but definitely not smaller.

Post # 58
Member
278 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I am an advocate of spay/neuter but I understand not everyone is on the same page as me (and that’s fine!).

I personally would take a look at your dog, your life style, and what you plan to do with him. We live in an apartment complex where a lot of people have dogs (they range from tiny poms to the guy a few buildings dwn with the walking couch great dane.) Our dogs socialize and we talk about them. We also take our girl to the city dog park where she has a ton of furry male buddies.

When an unaltered male gets around other dogs (male or female) he wants to hump them. Period. It doesn’t matter how the dog acts alone at home, he sees other dogs (and humans) and its all he can thing about. So, if you plan to go hiking or socializing your dog with others (something i always advocate if the dog has a good temperment) then do get him snipped.

In terms of medical benefits, I have heard as much pro as con in if a male should be snipped. I would err on the side of caution and non-sticky furniture and get him fixed. But! that is just me.

Post # 59
Member
609 posts
Busy bee

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@MrsPanda99:  You don’t seem to be asking for advice with the intent to consider it. Every piece of advice that goes against your own beliefs is being shot down. 

I believe you need to speak with professionals for what is best for your dog, including your vet. 

Post # 61
Member
10361 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

I think that people who are unwilling to spay/neuter should not be pet owners. Why are you even asking us, OP, if you seem so against doing it?

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