(Closed) Where to go from here…?

posted 5 years ago in TTC
Post # 18
Member
2176 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

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sushiroll84 :  So, I think what @pearlrose was getting at is this:

If you ovulate, no matter what day in your cycle, you will have a luteal phase that is consistent (within 1-2 days) every time you ovulate. This will not change. However, the day of ovulation will change, which is what will cause irregular cycles. 

If you think you are having a 2 day luteal phase, for example, then ovulation has NOT occurred. The way your body works is that when you ovulate, your follicle collapses and becomes the corpus luteum – which produces progesterone (that in turn, gives you the “luteal phase”). Even with extreme progestrone deffiency/luteal phase defect, it is not possible to even confirm ovulation until 7 days post ovulation. If your body were literally producing no progesterone, this is something your RE should have been able to test for long ago.

What is most likely happening, is that your LH is surging, causing you to *think* you are about to ovulate (or even getting a postive OPK, or an ultrasound that looks like you have mature follicles) and release an egg, but it never happens. Instead, you get your period….which causes you to have “short” cycles around 23 days.

Have you had all of your labs done, CD 3 monitoring etc? If not, I would strongly suggest doing that. It might give a better idea of what is going on with your ovulation.

Post # 20
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2176 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

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sushiroll84 :  It’s not that you shouldn’t believe your Dr, however if he says that you have ovulated/are ovulating, then he should follow up with additional monitoring. You need a blood test to confirm ovulation. Unfortuantely, ultrasounds can only show the size of follicles and/or cysts that are either PCOS related or your corpus luteum from the current cycle. So unless your Dr. is following up to confirm you are ovulating what he sees on the screen, there is nothing to believe….

Ask to go in for a progesterone test. If you are truly 6 or 7DPO right now, this will confirm ovulation has occurred. I’m only saying this out of experience, but you need to be your own advocate. To most Drs, you are a number. They aren’t as invested in this as you. Do a lot of research, ask questions and advocate for yourself and what you think needs to happen in order to solve the mystery.

Additionally, if you truly are concerned about having a 2 day LP (which like I said, is not really possible to ovulate and not have a CL that exists), then why won’t your RE start you on a medicated cycle? Even just 5 days of clomid or fermara with monitoring and progesterone after O should fix whatever luteal phase issue you have. 

I think it is also possible that you are ovulating late, around day 21-23 and experiencing bleeding with ovulation, which is also common. Ask for a progesterone test during your next baseline and see what it says.

Post # 21
Member
172 posts
Blushing bee

You should read Taking Charge of Your Fertiliy, I found it super helpful! I think what PP was saying about your period not being due yet is that usually, irregular cycles manifest in unpredictable ovulation time. For most people, the luteal phase is the same length every single month, +/- a day or so. So, if your luteal phase is the average ~14 days, then your period is not actually due yet, because you ovulated late. I know you mentioned that you once ovulated and then got your period 2 days later, but that shouldn’t be happening. You need a luteal phase of at least 10ish days (I think) in order to stay pregnant. 

I would check out the info on that and confirm with your doc. Good luck!!

Also, I got my BFP 9DPO, but I was a prego test addict, so I started taking cheapies around 7DPO. 🙂

 

Edit: posted before seeing the most recent responses. I totally agree about going in for bloodwork after you believe you’ve ovulated, in order to confirm. If your luteal phase really is 2 days, that’s something that needs to be addressed, and it CAN be addressed with medication. Unfortunately, sometimes you really do need to push these issues yourself, if your doctor doesn’t see the urgency. Not sure if this is your second month trying, I could be mistaken but it seems that way based on your last thread. It’s possible the doctors aren’t take you as seriously because you just started trying?

Post # 22
Member
1077 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

I vote Pregnant.  🙂

Post # 23
Member
1702 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2015

I guess what you already know, and what seems to be the consensus, is that something doesnt add up.  Have you gone to see a fertility doctor specifically?  If not, that would be my next step probably.  

Post # 24
Member
600 posts
Busy bee

What you should do from here is probably look into seeing a fertility specialist. You can’t be ovulating and then having your period 2-3 days later, even if that seems like what’s happening. BeverlyGeese’s explanation above is spot on. At 6dpo, you can’t be having pregnancy symptoms yet. 5-6 days is the earliest that a fertilized egg could implant and then you’d have to wait for hcg to be produced for you to have symptoms and a positive test. It sounds like you’ve been having annovulatory cycles where your body gears up to ovulate then doesn’t, and perhaps this time you actually did ovulate. It’s hard to know what your dr is thinking, but maybe they aren’t explaining things in full or there’s some misunderstanding, because a 2-3 day luteal phase doesn’t happen. Good luck as you move forward! 

Post # 26
Member
2176 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

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sushiroll84 :  Not to sound crass, but any pursuit of family building is going to be overwhelming and stressful.

Adoption is just as, if not more, stressful and consuming than infertility…which is why many people choose it as a last resort. The process of home visits, people rifling through your personal and financial life, waiting to be “matched” and then for the baby that can be taken back by the birth mother even after placed in your home. It isn’t a guaranteed child….

As far as being on medication or going to IVF, I can undersatnd that. But also – with infetility and issues with your cycle also can come many other health factors. If you did have PCOS, for example, and it causes blood sugar issues- wouldn’t you want to fix that? I feel like when women say they don’t want to use meds to treat infertility, they often don’t see it as a real medical condition, which it is. If you were told that you have heart issues or cholesterol problems, you wouldn’t think twice about medication that can prevent major health complications. Just my two cents.

Good luck to you, OP.

Post # 28
Member
600 posts
Busy bee

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sushiroll84 :  it’s a little early in the process to be throwing in the towel and jumping to IVF. Your problem may be a relatively quick fix with meds or something once you see a specialist who could address these issues properly. You’re only on your second month of TTC, and lots of people need a few months to figure out cycles. If you know that if it came down to IVF or adopting and you’d rather adopt, go for it, but please do it for the right reasons and not because ttc is overwhelming. Adoption is arguably way more overwhelming and also…raising kids is pretty stressful and overwhelming at times. I’m sorry you’re having some issues and this isn’t as easy as you’d like, but keep in perspective that lots of people struggle and spend a long time trying to become parents and you’re still very early in the process. I hope you’re able to get to the bottom of what’s going on and address it quickly. 

Post # 29
Member
1787 posts
Buzzing bee

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sushiroll84 :  I’m sorry you’re having to deal with fertility issues, it’s not very fun is it? I second other posters though in making sure that you get a diagnosis and to treat the condition even if your end goal isn’t to get pregnant. A cycle of only 23 days is not normal and likely indicates some kind of hormonal imbalance. Like another poster has mentioned, a lot of conditions can cause other health issues as well as reproductive ones. For example, PCOS you’re at risk for diabetes, heart problems, & endometrial cancer. Please continue to pursue this with a doctor. I’d also second an RE, or at the very least, a regular endocrinologist.

 

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