(Closed) Who here loves her career?

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 31
Member
2838 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

beetee123:  I have a Bachelor of Science in Business Management. Most of the other tech writers I work with have English or Communication types of degrees.

Post # 32
Member
448 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

4everafter:  I have a JD and I am a Compliance Manager. My job is JD preferred rather than required, but I graduated in 2013 and the economy sucks. I like it and it is nice to have a related career, even if not traditional. The pay is also okay. I will be here until I can find an entry level in-house position. They actually exist here in the midwest, but are few and far between. I am not interested in a firm for exactly the reasons you stated.

Post # 33
Member
4508 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I do love my job. I’m a magazine editor for a nonprofit organization, and it’s basically my dream job. Sure, there are days where I’d rather be somewhere else (or days where I have to deal with people who are angry or argumentative), but overall, I’m very happy at work.

Post # 34
Member
723 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

swonderful: Thank you so much for sharing your experience, it was very useful! I am having a career-change freakout, and will definitely pursue some freelance writing gigs. I’m honestly happy to write about anything at this point. And you really can’t beat those perks. 🙂

 

Post # 35
Member
579 posts
Busy bee

I’m a journalist and I love it. I work for a media company that owns several magazines and online publications and I write for all of them. Writing is my greatest talent and I love news, so it’s awesome. It would be nice to have one of those jobs where you get to stop at 1pm, go out and have a lunch break, but oh well. One thing I really like is that I can dress pretty casually (unless I’m meeting someone for an interview).

Post # 37
Member
12 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: December 2015

I’m a full commission sales rep for a enviornmental consulting company.  I don’t have a great interest in what I do, but I love the indpenedent nature of the work.  I work almost solely from home or in my car.  Since I’m full commission and the company is small and really laid back, I don’t have any sales goals so there is no pressure on me for sales.  I choose when, where and how hard I want to work.  I got really lucky.  I still contemplate eventually leaving for something else that I actually have interest in, but I know I won’t have these same independent perks.   

Post # 38
Member
1133 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I have 3 jobs right now…I work in advertising primarily, and do graphic design for a local salon and spa 32 hours a week, and do marketing for another company as well 32 hours a week, then I work part time in retail during the nights and weekends, approximately 20 hours a week.  <br /><br />It’s definitely not ideal having to work 9am to midnight (as I am tonight), but Fiance recently got laid off and is unemployed (he was making the most money), and I have to pay all living expenses plus our wedding off now. Needless to say I don’t sleep!

I hate advertising, it’s low pay, long hours, and mentally exhausting, so I’m hoping after the wedding and if Fiance gets a job, I can go back to school again or start my own business.

Post # 39
Member
35 posts
Newbee

I am an emergency room nurse and I love every minute of it! I work the night shift, which although I absolutely love my crew at night, it’s been challenging after doing it for almost 4 years. It also doesn’t help that I commute an hour and a half to work, so may have to make some changes soon.. but overall, I love my job, love the pace and love that things are always different every day.

Post # 40
Member
82 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

I definitely don’t love what I do, but I don’t hate it either.

I work as a research technician in a molecular biology lab. It’s my first job out of college (graduated in 2013). It’s a little repetitive, the pay sucks ($27K a year, and I have an Ivy League degree in molecular biology), and it’s a bit of a dead-end job. But at least it’s not really a stressful job, my workplace environment is good, and it’s always nice when one of my experiments gets promising results. Plus I get to do cool stuff like electron microscopy and operating a fast protein liquid chromatography machine. Also I get downtime while waiting for experiments to run and so on, when I can just waste time on the Internet, LOL.

I am also studying on my own to become a software developer (mainly focusing on Javascript and Android for now, since that’s where the demand is). I am worried about the hours and the stress of that job though. My fiance is a software developer and he works about 50-60 hours a week and is very stressed out by his job. I’m also worried about being too stupid to become a developer…so far I have found it pretty difficult. My first job will probably be in QA since that is usually the entry level for developers.

Post # 41
Member
82 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: July 2016

doubletrouble25:  I commute an hour and a half to work too. The struggle is real! I do take public transportation so at least I don’t have to drive that distance, but I get motion sickness so I can’t even read. It usually just becomes naptime….

Post # 42
Member
176 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

swonderful:  Thank you so much for sharing that! I am currently an associate editor for a trade publication and have always had a goal of becoming a freelance writer. Originally I wanted to focus on magazine writing, but as you mentioned, I’ve come to learn the money is in copywriting (not that I would stop pitching story ideas I’m really interested in). 

My struggle right now is finding the time/energy to commit to freelance work while working full-time (90% of what I do is writing). How much time did you have to spend per week building up your business while you worked in the office? How long did it take before you went full-time with it? Any conflicts with time management that you ran into while you were employed elsewhere? I’m a little hesitant to pursue freelance work because I’m afraid I may take on too much or struggle to balance it with full-time work, and cause one of them to suffer. I also travel frequently for my job, which could make meeting deadlines difficult. 

Anyways, I’m really glad you shared this. I’ve been feeling a bit disillusioned with the freelance life, thinking that maybe it’s not as great as I imagined it’d be, but hearing how much you enjoy your lifestyle and the freedom you have has renewed my hope 🙂

Post # 43
Member
52 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

I’m a physician and I love it. Sure, it’s high stakes, high stress, and residency in general is tough, but I love taking care of my patients as well as the intellectual challenge. As an anesthesiology resident, I’m always on my feet and working with my hands, which I also love. I saved a life two days ago during an intense surgery which was awesome. 

I dated a law student when I was in medical school, and my dad is an attorney. In general, I think law is a tough field to be in because people aren’t as nice to each other and it’s so political. You see some of that in medicine too, but in general it’s less than what I have observed my dad go through. As a rule, I feel like medicine attracts a slightly warmer crowd. There are tons of exceptions each way though. 

Post # 44
Member
244 posts
Helper bee

4everafter:  i do! but i know the feeling of not being into what you do anymore. case in point- I have an MSW but the whole nonprofit social work thing just wasn’t my CALLING and in that profession you really need to deep deep down feel like that’s the only kind of work you were meant to do.

i switched to HR and i love it so much more. way better fit for my personality, interests, and ambitions. actually, law is a great background for HR if it’s something you might be interested in. it’s not the transactional stuff people think it is when you’re at the mid to upper levels (which you would be w a law degree). pays quite well, too!

good luck!!

Post # 45
Member
2348 posts
Buzzing bee

ShoeGal89:  Hey! Time is where I was lucky. My office job was at a state run university and government work isn’t exactly demanding. My office was heavily unionized and even secretaries got tenure, which resulted in a lot of people who did little to no work so expectations were unbelievably low. I probably only did real work about 2 hours a day at that job so I had loads of time to work on other things. 

I would recommend you make an expectation plan first. Establish how much money you need to make to support yourself 100% by freelancing. Then establish how much you want to be actively pulling in before quitting your job. I wasn’t making a full income from freelancing when I quit my office job, but I planned for it. I’m a super saver so I had enough savings to supplement myself for over two years if I really had to (based on what I was already making from freelance jobs).

My goal was to be making a full salary (i.e. covering all living expenses plus a little to put into savings/investments) by month 6 of freelancing full-time. Within the first two months I was making a full income. I’ve orchestrated my life to cost as little as possible (while living in NYC) so if your standard of living is much higher than mine it will probably take you longer to work your way up, but that’s where I’d start.  

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