(Closed) Who pays if a window is broken by a golf ball?

posted 6 years ago in Legal
Post # 3
Member
10288 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

I grew up next door to a golf course. On occasion we’d have things broken by stray balls and as far as I know, the damages were covered by the courses insurance. I would imagine that different courses have different policies, though.

Post # 4
Member
2651 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

The course insurance should cover it, most definitely if there is no signs up.  

Post # 6
Member
1830 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

I would push for the course to cover it – they might not want to claim it, but they should. Maybe they made that other guy foot the bill because he was none-the-wiser about insurance policies owned by the course?

Post # 7
Member
865 posts
Busy bee

I absolutely would pay for it. I am an avid golfer and if I hit a shot and it caused damage I would absolutely pay for it, no second thoughts.

Post # 8
Member
4327 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 1992

@mmr66:  Depends on the state you’re in as to the laws that govern tort claims, but I’d imagine the business casualty insurance should pay for damage. I wouldn’t worry too much about the phone call. If insurance is to be used, a police report is necessary to document the damage so the insurance company knows they are paying on a vailid claim. This is a sort of physical evidence for the case. Just because a report is on file with your SO as the party who physically damaged the property, it does not mean that he will necessarily be held liable, as your SO was an agent patron of the golf course itself. The golf course should have netting up to dissuade errant balls from flying beyond course limits. If it does not, that is not your SO’s problem that the business did not have proper means to mitigate potential harm.

I used to work for a municipality liability department. They had golf courses bordering a county road, and golfers would sometimes damage vehicles passing by. The municipality generally covered these expenses for the motorists. Try to relax. But if someone comes after you guys for the dough, definitely get estimates of the property damage, and if worse comes to worst, you can submit the claim to home owner’s insurance policy. 

ETA: Be vigilante with speaking to the golf course’s general manager, and make sure to ask under what carrier they keep their business personal property casualty insurance. Ask for a claim number, and the adjuster with whom a claim was filed. Get that person’s phone number and extension. These are things you will need to ask to be sure the golf course is doing the right thing by making a good faith effort to file a claim. If they sense they are working with a “less than educated” patron, they may try to bilk the $ out of you without so much as an effort to file a claim, if they think they can make that happen. 

Post # 9
Member
726 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

If the course said their insurance would cover it then that’s what should happen. On a side note, what a rude woman! If she was going to want a police report filed every time something got broken on her property while living next to a golf course, then she shouldn’t live next to a golf course. Like CaitMarae said, people that live next to golf courses get things broken on their property all the time! I think its just part of living where balls are flying around all day. 

Post # 10
Member
726 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@StuporDuck:  Oh okay, that makes more sense as to why a police report had to be filed. I was under the impression that she just wanted to have him held liable for something even though the situation was handled by the course!

Post # 11
Member
4327 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: January 1992

@paigers91:  The woman isn’t being rude. It’s just a matter of procedure. That’s how things get done. People have the “burden of proof” in documenting property damage. Without this evidence, insurance carriers do not pay claims. It’s just a function of the system. Without it, the insurance carrier has no way to know whether the window was broken by the golf ball, or if some raging lunatic came over with a baseball bat and broke it, or if a house cat playfully ran into it. This weeds out fraud cases, and helps the home owner get recompensed more expeditiously.

The topic ‘Who pays if a window is broken by a golf ball?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors