(Closed) Who to tip for wedding vendors?

posted 5 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 2
Member
443 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

I tipped people who provided an actual service to me (not neccessarily a product), so dj, coordinator, beauty, officiant, photographers but I didnt tip the baker.

Post # 3
Member
1338 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Bored6:  You tip people who work for someone else.  You do not tip people that are self employed.  If you hire a DJ that works for himself and not under a talent agency then you do not tip him becuase he has set his own fees and you are paying him directly.  If he works for a company then you do tip him because he did not set his own fees and you are paying the comapany for the service, not him, so you give him a gratuity in that case.

 

 

Post # 5
Member
1338 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Bored6:  As I understand it, no you do not need to technically.  That said, music can be one of the more personal services and if you want to tip them for a job well done then there is no reason not to.  

 

Post # 6
Member
1692 posts
Bumble bee

When someone enters into a business relationship with you, business etiquette requires that you treat them professionally, making sure that the terms of your agreement are clearly laid out and that you negotiate a fair price for the services you receive, which you then pay promptly according to your agreement. If you are pleased with their performance of the contracted services, you give them your return business and recommend them to others.

“Tipping” people with whom you have such a professional relationship is bad form: it implies that you think of them as subordinates rather than as peers in a business relationship, and it muddies the clarity of future price quotes since suppliers who expect tips submit low-ball bids that undercut their competitors, expecting to make up the difference in hidden fees labelled as “service fees” and “compulsory gratuities”.

It is a different case when someone who does not have a contract with you, provides special personal service. Your recommendations and return business do not do them any direct good, and they did not have the option of negotiating with you directly. Depending on your jurisdiction’s minimum wage laws, they may be paid only a fraction of a living wage and be reliant on your generosity (although personally I recommend checking your vendors’ fair-wage practices and not hiring the ones who routinely pay less than a living wage). From a social perspective, providing a tip creates a social distance between you and a service-provider that prevents any sense that the service provider is taking liberties or trying to ingratiate herself with you. So you tip those who are hired by your vendors, but not the vendors themselves.

If a vendor truly delivers services in excess of their contract, you may pay them a “bonus”, and expect them to charge the increased amount and deliver the increased expectation, the next time that you hire them.

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