(Closed) WHOA.

posted 8 years ago in Secular
Post # 3
Member
4123 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Check with your state law because I know some people who applied online and got the license to marry. I think in most states as long as you have that license you can legally marry people… but again, it vary’s state by state.

Post # 4
Member
3285 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2009

Yup, states laws are different…I’d check with your Clerk of Courts!

Post # 5
Member
224 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

ughhh that’s so irritating!

What about doing the legal part at City Hall, and then having whomever you want (even a friend, relative, etc) do the ceremony? 

Post # 8
Member
2208 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Unless your state requires that the person solemnizing the wedding have an active congregation, I’m sure a secular humanist officiant will be able to do it. From the state code:

Sec. 209. Solemnization and Registration.)
    (a) A marriage may be solemnized by a judge of a court of record, by a retired judge of a court of record, unless the retired judge was removed from office by the Judicial Inquiry Board, except that a retired judge shall not receive any compensation from the State, a county or any unit of local government in return for the solemnization of a marriage and there shall be no effect upon any pension benefits conferred by the Judges Retirement System of Illinois, by a judge of the Court of Claims, by a county clerk in counties having 2,000,000 or more inhabitants, by a public official whose powers include solemnization of marriages, or in accordance with the prescriptions of any religious denomination, Indian Nation or Tribe or Native Group, provided that when such prescriptions require an officiant, the officiant be in good standing with his religious denomination, Indian Nation or Tribe or Native Group. Either the person solemnizing the marriage, or, if no individual acting alone solemnized the marriage, both parties to the marriage, shall complete the marriage certificate form and forward it to the county clerk within 10 days after such marriage is solemnized.
    (b) The solemnization of the marriage is not invalidated by the fact that the person solemnizing the marriage was not legally qualified to solemnize it, if either party to the marriage believed him to be so qualified or by the fact that the marriage was inadvertently solemnized in a county in Illinois other than the county where the license was issued.
(Source: P.A. 95‑775, eff. 1‑1‑09.)

Post # 10
Member
2208 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

You also have a ways to go. My suggestion would be to call an officiant you are interested in, and ask about the legalities. The only thing that looks slightly hinky about Illinois is their concern over which county issues the license. If you are marrying in the city, which I seem to remember you are, you may need a Cook county license and a resident from there.

Post # 12
Member
2208 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I didn’t look too much into the details about Cook, but they do accept out of state couples marrying in state, so I don’t think residency will matter, just where you get the license.

One thing to consider is that secular humanist congregations are sprouting up all over the place. There is one here in Sacramento (I think it is not my cup of tea, but whatever people need). So, don’t dismiss that possibility quite so quickly.

Another resource is the Unitarians. Plenty of Unitarians are secular humanists (also not my cup of tea), so you might be able to find an officiant through them. Some congregations are more Christian-lite (really hope I didn’t offend), and some are more pantheist, and still others are varied or humanist, so you’ll have to do some digging.

Post # 13
Member
348 posts
Helper bee

This is going to depend in part on how strictly “religious denomination” is defined in practice.  They may recognize groups that are actually pretty secular.  If you have an officiant in mind, I’d imagine s/he has a standard way of dealing with the legalities.  If not, you might look for a Unitarian minister – at least in my local congregation, they are 100% open to atheists even as congregation members, and so should be able to respect your beliefs.

ETA – I see I’m not the only one who thought about the unitarians…

Post # 15
Member
130 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

UGGGGHHHHHHHHH so freakin’ unfair.  absolutely ridiculous how much of a joke “separation of church and state” really is.  even the JOPs always include some kind of religious reference in their ceremonies (at least all the ones I’ve been to).

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