(Closed) Why Natural Births?

posted 6 years ago in Babies
Post # 17
Member
423 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

@DaneLady:  yep. everything she said! well put 🙂

Post # 18
Member
423 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

Also want to say that the natural birth is my choice – and I respect anyone who wants to do it a different way. Birth is personal! Do what feels right to you 🙂

Post # 19
Member
508 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@KoiKove:  I had no idea gas and air (nitrous oxide) was not used commonly in the US!

I’m about to have a baby (UK) and I would like to just use gas and air and have a water birth.  I have also done yoga and listened to hypnobirthing CDs.

I will try hard not to have an epidural as I want to stay mobile, be in the water, eat and drink, and not slow labour down, therefore increasing the chance of other interventions and ultimately c-section.  However, I am totally reserving the right to change my mind when I’m in labour!! I have chosen to give birth in a birth centre (midwives only) so if i chose to have an epidural, I’d have to be moved to a different part of the hospital.

Post # 20
Member
1649 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2000

Interesting responses.  I am currently pregnant with my first child and still up in the air about how I want to give birth.  I don’t think I am skewed in one particular direction over another.  Pretty sure childbirth is the highest form of pain I will ever feel, but then again, I can’t even get a filing at the dentist without novacaine! We shall see…

Post # 21
Member
6290 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@Stiletto13:  I don’t want children; but when I thought I might, I always said I wanted a natural, home, water birth. My reasons were thus:

1) I have endometriosis. The pain is extremely severe, and literally the only thing that takes the edge off is breathing exercises and a warm bath. Painkillers do sweet FA, regardless of how strong they are. I firmly believe that not only would I be very well prepared for the pain of labour, having experienced pain that I would put at probably worse since the age of 11 for days on end every single month, but that more natural pain relief actually works best.

2) I dislike feeling out of control. For that reason, I don’t like taking strong painkillers unless absolutely necessary, and would not want something like an epidural as I wouldn’t have control over my body.

3) I believe it is important to move around during labour, and that birthing on your back or in stirrups is not only unnatural, but that it can slow down the birthing process, and increase the likelihood of interventions. So again, for that reason I would not want an epidural, and would like to be in a relaxed environment where I can move freely if I choose.

4) I like the idea of a water birth not only for the pain relieving aspects, but also because they reduce the risk of tearing and the need for an episiotomy.

 

That all said, I think that flexibility is key; I think it is dangerous for women to have a very fixed idea of how they think childbirth should or will progress, and it is wise, IMO, to be open to different possibilities. While (if I wanted children) I would prefer to go the natural home-birth route, I would be sensible enough to realise that that may not be possible (eg if the pregnancy was high-risk) or that it might change as labour progressed (eg I might find that actually the pain got too much, or it might be going very slowly and I might get tired, or there might be complications; etc) and I wouldn’t pin everything on having a natural birth.

Post # 22
Member
3081 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I’m starting to think about these things now, so I appreciate you having started this thread and all the responses thus far. I will certainly research this on my own, but does anyone have a study or stats showing the percentages of emergency c-sections in births that had medical interventions (I guess specifically epidural or pitocin) versus those that didn’t?

Theses are some interesting points. I had always assumed I’d have an epidural, well, just because of the pain factor…but it’s worth additional research for sure.

Post # 23
Member
12246 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

@brlabrat:  +1! I took biological anthropology in college, and our professor would wistfully monologue about how monkeys can deliver their own babies, because of the pelvis/skull ratio.

I would like a natural birth, that would be my ideal, but only because (and this is really shallow) my Mom had “4 natural births and cancer twice”, and she wears it like a badge! So if I have an epidural, I will hear about it forever.

Post # 24
Member
7646 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

@DaneLady:  +1

 

To me, I want to trust that my body can do what it was made to do (as well as because of all the reasons that were listed in many PPs posts).

However, my baby’s health is my number one concern and priority over my birth plan, so I am one that is open to medical intervention if my baby’s health, or mine, is being compromised in any way.

In the end, the baby get’s his/her way, but in the meantime, if I can trust my body to deliver a baby med free, I am sure going to try.

Post # 26
Member
1401 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I wanted to at least try to go natural with the twins (though that didn’t end up happening due to a 33.5 hour back labour–I had an epi 29 hours in), just because I wanted to avoid the cascade of interventions (particularly a c-section). I also wanted the labour to progress as quickly as possible. 

In the end, I was sooooo glad to get the epi. I was so tired and spent by that point that an epidural helped me to get a second wind for pushing. Also, because it was a mobile epidural, I was able to move around, bounce on a birthing ball, and push for contractions without the exhausting pain. 

I was disappointed I the end when I had an EMCS due to dd’s brow presentation. Vaginal birth is supposed to be good because it helps prepare the baby’s lungs and the baby also gets a dose of good bacteria as they are coming out. If I could have had a vaginal birth, I totally would have because the benefits seem quite good to me. 

Post # 27
Member
1246 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@BrandNewBride:  Oh man, your mom too? Haha! My mother had easy pregnancies and deliveries with both of us kids — no meds, done in a few hours, super easy recovery. She is a birthing machine, and that is a high standard to live up to! She says stuff like “I could have done it 10 more times” and “I would buy stock in Lamaze if someone sold it.” I mostly want to do a natural birth when the time comes because I’m less afraid of the pain of childbirth than never living down an epidural!

I kid. Sort of. She’s my hero for being so positive with me about her birthing experiences, and I hope I can live up to her example. (Also hoping I inherited her awesome birthin’ skillz.)

Post # 28
Member
90 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I have not given birth yet, but my two primary goals for when I do so this summer are:

1. No epidural. As others have said, an epidural tends to slow down labor. It can also result in either more damage “down there” or a greater chance of having a c-section; since I am numb, I have no idea how hard/soft I am pushing. If I am pushing too hard, I might get the baby out but destroy myself in the process. If I am pushing too soft, I might not help the baby out enough and end up with a c-section. Which leads me to my second goal…

2. No c-section. A c-section is the equivalent of major surgery, and I prefer to avoid that if possible. I will (hopefully) recover faster and be more ambulatory sooner with a vaginal birth than a c-section. To every lady her own, but I personally find the thought of shoving a watermelon out of my vagina less frightening than being completely numb and knowing there are people cutting me open on the other side of a sheet!

Of course, whatever happens happens, and if I end up with one or both of those things, I won’t be too upset as long as I have a healthy baby. Aside from that, I am open to any other kind of pain relief or monitoring, even if they aren’t necessarily considered “natural.” 

Post # 29
Member
640 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

We are still TTC, but I would like to attempt a natural/drug-free birth, and see how far I make it. I’m definitely not against medical intervention (epidural if I feel I need it, c-section if it becoms emergent, etc.)- but I would at least like to try natural first. For that reason, I won’t set a specific birth plan, because there are so many things that could change in a moment- I don’t want to risk my baby’s life by being vehemently ‘anti-intervention’ or something. 

Then again, my threshold for pain isn’t the greatest so I may end up screaming for an epidural before I’ve even been at the hospital for 10 minutes, lol.

Post # 30
Member
678 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@brlabrat:  I really liked your sciency post. It’s easy to feel that 100% natural is the best way to go, but there are some very real limitations to the human body besides ability to handle the pain or not. I will never forget the moment in a college history class that scared me silly- they were showing us slides from an archeological excavation, and one of them showed a picture of a female skeleton… With the infant’s skull still wedged into the pelvis. I’ve questioned my own ability to birth naturally ever since.

We truly are fortunate to live in a time when we can make these kinds of choices for ourselves- and every woman is entitled to make her own in my opinion.

Post # 31
Member
5474 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Thank you everyone for being open minded and polite.  So far, I haven’t seen any judging 🙂

 

In response to those saying that you get pain medication for fillings (and other things like broken bones, etc):

Having a baby is not a medical condition.  It is not an illness or an injury, and often happens JUST fine without any medication.  Having a painful procedure without pain medicine is silly- since getting a filling or setting a broken bone wouldn’t be considered a natural bodily process.  

Also, the pain is… different.  I’n not going to blow sunshine up your skirt and say it doesn’t hurt, but the pain has a purpose.  There is a function to it.  I hope that makes sense… I don’t feel like I’m describing it well.

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