(Closed) Will be delivering at "Baby Friendly Hospital" – and Freaking out

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 47
Member
3008 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

solnishko1186 :  I think you will be just fine, then! Keep in mind it’s not all or nothing- you may need to supplement a tiny amount of formula but still go on to successfully breastfeed. If things aren’t going perfectly in the first few days it doesn’t mean you’ve “failed” and must switch to 100% formula and bottles. Unless you want to, that is! I completely understand keeping your plan very loose to not set yourself up for feeling pressure or disappointment. I also understand first time mom worries about the unknown, and imagine it must be even more with twins! I just don’t think a baby-friendly hospital deserves this much anxiety! Again, best wishes to you.

Post # 49
Member
1184 posts
Bumble bee

I’ve never heard of hospitals letting mams send their babies to a nursery. Like ever! So I’m amazed to hear that not having that is such a big issue. That article saying it’s unsafe sounds utterly insane to me (and I imagine it’s probably because using a nursery might mean higher claims on insurance and the impression I get of the US system is that any intervention is normalised and natural midwife led births are less common).

But then again, here in the UK we also get send home within 24 hours assuming there’s no complications so I also don’t get the entire days staying in hospital.

Post # 50
Member
8479 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

DaisyBlossom :  interventions are very normalized here – even refusing an IV upon admission can be a losing battle in some hospitals. I have had (well-meaning but ill informed) friends and family tell me that I’m basically already a bad mother for using a certified nurse midwife for my normal healthy pregnancy instead of an OB. Even though I’m delivering at an amazing hospital and my midwife works on a team with OBs in case a complication arises! 

Post # 51
Member
1184 posts
Bumble bee

LilliV :  That’s insane.  It HAS to be about money in my (very limited) view. I feel scared by what I read on here.

Here in the UK not having epidural is fairly common with my friends. Hypnobirthing is a thing and most people I know have had vaginally births with just pain tablets and/or gas and air. You don’t get inducted until you’re generally 41/42 weeks and all our care is done by midwifes. Some are entirely free standing midwives units and hospital units are mainly midwife care with doctors and consultants for high risk cases. 

Post # 52
Member
3008 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

solnishko1186 :  I wouldn’t give that opinion piece much credit. 15 deaths in how many years? Out of how many babies born? Your husband will be with you, correct? Or, if you are feeding or holding a baby and you start getting too drowsy, you could page a nurse to help you put the baby down, if you can’t manage it on your own. The term “breastfeeding industry” kind of made me snort. I mean, I suppose there is an industry of nursing bras, paid lactation consultants and nipple cream, but it has to be a minuscule compared to the formula industry. Maybe try reading positive pieces about baby-friendly hospitals and why they came about to put your mind at ease?

Post # 54
Member
892 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

solnishko1186 :  The Hospital I delivered DS at was like this, he ended up being dehydrated because my milk took about 5 days to come in. The hospital didn’t offer us any formula until we were re-admitted for his dehydration. My suggestion is bring your own premixed formula (you can buy it that way). Likely your milk won’t be in right away, so formula is a great back up until it comes in.

If Darling Husband and I have another baby, I’ll be delivering at that same hospital I did the first time around, and though I want to breastfeed, I’ll still be brining my own premixed formula, being re-admitted for DS’s dehydration was a real pain in the you know what that could have easily been avoided. 

Post # 56
Member
1438 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

The flip side of not being “baby friendly” is that formula companies are free to undermine breastfeeding and promote their own products by offering free samples and incorrect bf’ing advice to vulnerabLe new families, and hospital staff can “booby trap” new mothers by offering formula when it’s not medically necessary, not bringing baby back to Mum to feed and suggesting a host of other interventions that don’t support the biologically normal way to feed a newborn baby.

trust me, no hospital is going to deny you formula if it’s medically necessary or indicated and if you are making a CHOICE to give formula (which is totally your right as a family!) then why shouldn’t you provide it?

And governments promote breastfeeding because they know it saves lives at a public health level and results in lower health costs further down the line. And if WIC can save money by promoting breastfeeding then that sounds like just good business sense to me (especially if we can set women up to succeed rather than undermining them!).

Post # 57
Member
3008 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

solnishko1186 :  well, I think the government SHOULD promote breastfeeding over formula. It saves health care costs down the line- obesity, ear infections, respiratory illness, diarrhea, etc rates are lowered. It’s much healthier and cheaper (although not necessarily easier, obviously some women have a much harder time with breastfeeding for either physical or socioeconomic reasons).

Post # 58
Member
36 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2016

 

solnishko1186 :  I’ve read that opinion piece before, as well as the author’s blog, and I really hope you won’t let yourself be freaked out by her! The author is a former OB, she quit practicing years ago, and she currently makes her living by her articles/blog. Unfortunately her stuff is pretty alarmist/extremist, sometimes to the point of flat out bullying. This is a person who searches the internet for personal stories of newborn loss and links to them on a public blog (without the consent of the grieving parents) so that she and her readers can talk about how the babies wouldn’t have died if the parents hadn’t made the “wrong” birth choices…that’s chillingly cruel and I can’t take her at all seriously because of it. She is constantly bringing up dead babies in her arguments, but strangely never addresses actual large scale causes of infant/child deaths because that’s not part of her agenda, I guess. Please don’t let her frighten you! There are much better sources out there. 🙂 

The link referencing babies dying in hospital beds, for example…of course cosleeping in a hospital bed while you’re drugged up is risky, that’s why hospitals (baby-friendly and otherwise) do NOT want you to do that! I attended a friend’s birth at a baby-friendly hospital about six weeks ago and they specifically said that she could not sleep with baby in the bed with her and she was not taking anything but ibuprofen. They provide the same little plastic bassinet thing in your hospital room that they do in any other hospital, that is where baby is supposed to sleep while parents are sleeping. Having baby room in with you but sleeping in his/her own crib is actually the safest option both in hospital and at home, it’s what the current SIDS prevention guidelines recommend. So the idea that baby-friendly/rooming in policies somehow means you’re encouraged/forced to resort to unsafe sleep practices is pretty ludicrous. (My friend was also unable to breastfeed due to a rare condition involving underdeveloped breast tissue…she didn’t know this ahead of time and tried to breastfeed. The hospital staff tried to help her, but when it became clear that baby needed something else they offered her donor milk or formula. She ended up trying both and now has a formula fed baby. Her baby was assessed for dehydration, blood sugar levels, etc. the whole time they were in the hospital, they absolutely put baby’s health and safety first!) 

Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiatives were started in the 90s by the WHO and UNICEF. They are definitely not a conspiracy cooked up by the US govt to avoid paying for formula, haha. I highly recommend you look at the WHO website, they have a lot of info about breastfeeding/Baby-Friend Hospital Initiatives that you might find reassuring…all the fuss over breastfeeding is for health reasons, not for some kind of financial gain. That’s not to say that formula is unhealthy, it’s a good choice for lots of families, there are just some benefits/risk reductions with breastfeeding that formula alone can’t offer so it makes sense to encourage breastfeeding when we can. The main differences that I could tell with the baby-friendly hospital is that they keep babies in the room with you (but that seems to be common practice nowadays in other hospitals, too), they don’t offer “free samples” of formula provided by formula companies, and they have lactation specialists available to help new moms (also seems to be growing in popularity overall). None of those things are dangerous or scary, I’m pretty sure. 

I’m planning to have my baby in a baby-friendly hospital too 🙂 

Post # 60
Member
84 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

PearlGrey :  Thank you for writing this.  I’m also having my baby in a baby-friendly hospital – and so happy and grateful to be doing so!

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