(Closed) Will you force your child(ren)to college?

posted 7 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: Will you force them?

    Yes (why)

    No (why)

    My having gone to college sways this

    My having gone to college does not sway this

    Other (comment!)

    My having NOT gone to college sways this

    My having NOT gone to college does not sway this

  • Post # 227
    Member
    18 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: June 2014

    Why would anyone “force” their child to go to college?  I mean, if you want to guarantee dumping your child off in the real world with 10k+ in debt, then by all means “force” them to go to college.

    But college is not all it’s cracked up to be.  In fact, I would almost call it a bad investment, now-a-days.

    Post # 228
    Member
    263 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

    I voted No as a result of my experiences with my degree. I want my children to go to college because they absolutely have to know things about the area in which they want to study. In my experience, a lot of students go to college (my current friends included) because they don’t know what they want to do in life and it seems the only thing to do. I can’t tell you how much it hurts to see people who are only studying the subject that you are absolutely in love with because they don’t know what they want to do in life. It devalues a lot of the prestige and honour that should come with earning a degree. College is something that people shouldnt be forced to doing because its “what people do”. People should go to college so they can learn about the things they want to learn about in order to get the job and career path that they want.  

    Post # 229
    Member
    2268 posts
    Buzzing bee

    View original reply
    @almostmrsj:  “Force?  No.  Strongly encourage, especially if they want to pursue a career in a field where a degree is actually required?  Yes.

    +1.

    View original reply
    @HonoraryNerd:  “I won’t force them to go to college, but they’re going to do something. Military, trade school, get certified in some area. Find a real people job. I’m not going to let them sit around like a bump on a log after high school. It doesn’t have to be college, but it’s gotta be something.

    +1.

    Post # 230
    Member
    7570 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: October 2014

    View original reply
    @ddstobe2015:  I didn’t finish college— only went one semester really– I’m earning comfortably over six figures. I work in IT and started with some basic skills, mostly self-taught, worked my way up from help desk to engineering over the years.  I’ve taken various vendors’ exams like Microsoft, Cisco, etc, but never had a class more than one week in anything and did most of the exams with self-study. My history/education is pretty much the same to most of my co-workers, who are all in the same salary range. My Fi also is self-taught in IT, high school diploma only, worker his way up and also earns over six figures.

    we also have a neighbor who is quite comfortable as a professional waiter; before anyone denies that you can be a professional waiter, there really is such a thing, mostly at the very high end restaurants in big cities. You can make $80k/year and up but you must be absolutely impeccable with the level of service you provide. Some restaurants offer 401(k) and other benefits.

    a friend worked her way up from bartender at a local hotel to regional manager of that chain (Marriott) with no college degree. She majored in (but didn’t complete) art history so that skillset hasn’t been used at all towards her career.

    i can list more as I know quite a few successful people who didn’t go to or didn’t finish college!

    Post # 231
    Member
    1856 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: March 2013

    View original reply
    @This Time Round:  Actually, your thoughts re: low drop-out rates & higher post-secondary attendance in QC are totally inaccurate. QC has the highest percentage of high school drop-outs in the country (10.6%; national avg is around 8%). We have the second lowest percentage of university participation in the country, and the only reason we have a greater percentage for college/trade school participation is due to most people completing at least some CEGEP (which is often not enough for employment in most fields now).

    Post # 232
    Member
    9948 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: December 2012

    TO

    View original reply
    @kittyface:  ummm, don’t know where you get your stats, but having lived in BOTH Quebec & Ontario I can tell you that fewer Ontario Students finish HS here…

    Last year it was 83%… a huge climb from when my own kids were in HS back in the early 2000s when it was less than 70%

    http://news.ontario.ca/edu/en/2013/04/high-school-graduation-rate-continues-to-climb.html

    Having grown up in Quebec, I was totally shocked by how few kids here finished HS

    In comparisson to Quebec, I still stand by my previous post… finishing HS and some College / CEGEP education (especially when CEGEP education is so transportable as I explained in my OP) is still a millions times better than what I see here in Ontario.

     

    Post # 233
    Member
    292 posts
    Helper bee

    No, and me going to college does not sway my opinion.

    What I want for my children is for them to have a fulfulling life in a career they enjoy, whether that means college, a trade, or a non-certificate job. As long as they’re happy, I’ll be happy.

    Post # 234
    Member
    1856 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: March 2013

    View original reply
    @This Time Round:  I’m from Montreal. I use Canadian statistics every day in my research work. I consult with the government on education and employment data.

    HRSDC shows the drop-out rates by region for 1992-95 and 2009-2012. Quebec’s drop-out rate in 2009-2012 is 10.6%, compared to Ontario at 6.6%, and the national average at 8.1%.

    Last year, drop-out rates were perceived to be so high in many schools that the Quebec government refused to release graduation statistics for more than 200 secondary schools. As you can read here (the data is unfortunately not available in a public format), QC’s high school graduation rate for the 2009-2010 school year was 73.8% – they hope to reach 80% in 2020.

    You can also see the data for university participation in the young adult population for 2003-2006 also through HRSDC – 23% nationally, 20% in QC, 27% in ON. We do consistently have higher rates of college enrolment, due to the CEGEP system.

    So while observations are grand, the data on this issue is clear.

    (Sorry for threadjacking, OP, I just prefer facts).

    Post # 235
    Member
    372 posts
    Helper bee

    No, of course I wouldn’t force them! I’d support them in whatever made them happy- be that a ‘career’ or a job that just pays the bills. But they would need to be doing something to support themselves and be responsible for their own choices and the consequences.

    I would never force someone to go to university against their will. I would only encourage them if I truly believed it was in their best interests for making them happy.

    By The Way, I have a PhD myself and I work as a lecturer (asst professor) in the UK. So I’m not biased against education at all! But I don’t believe in forcing people past compulsory education. I don’t think it’s good for anyone involved.

    The topic ‘Will you force your child(ren)to college?’ is closed to new replies.

    Find Amazing Vendors