(Closed) Will you make your kids eat what you do, or will you fix them something else?

posted 8 years ago in Parenting
  • poll: What kind of meal will you prepare for your child?

    My child will eat what I eat

    I will cook my child something different than what I am having

    other?

  • Post # 137
    Member
    299 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: May 2011

    View original reply
    @Genuine513:  Let me guess, you don’t have children. 

    Post # 138
    Member
    785 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    View original reply
    @country chic:  I was honestly curious if anyone knew of a child that did an actual hunger strike.  I grew up without seeing any sort of picky eating and wanted to know what would happen if a parent took the hard line “eat or starve” approach.

    Post # 139
    Member
    4272 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: April 2012

    Making two different meals sounds like alot of work to me.

    You will eat it and like it!

    Post # 140
    Member
    4272 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: April 2012

    View original reply
    @Mrs.Mittens:  I hid my food in my napkin or mushed it on my plate to make it look like I ate it…. I did this with meatloaf mainly. I just went without one meal, not a huge deal. Meatloaf is gross!

    “But mom I ate like half of it! See?!”

    Post # 141
    Member
    9816 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

    My brother used to chew his food then spit it out in a paper napkin when no one was looking, pocket it, then flush it down the toilet! Kids are pretty crafty when they have a genuine dislike of a certain food.

    Post # 142
    Member
    4272 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: April 2012

    View original reply
    @KatyElle:  Ah yes, the toilet! It was the only way to effectively hide the evidence!

    Post # 143
    Member
    1812 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: February 2012

    I grew up in the “You will eat what is in front of you or nothing at all” household.  We were each allowed 3 things we didn’t have to eat if we didn’t like it.  Mine were livers, carrots cut in disks and olives.  I love most of those things now – just the carrots in disks – but beside the point.  When I was a nanny the parents would cook on demand whatever the children felt like eating because they were worried about them going to bed on an empty stomach.  I did my super-nanny thing and eventually we got there and they would eat, or at least try things put in front of them. Parents learnt the kids don’t die if they go to bed on an empty stomach, and kids learnt that there was no more chocolate or pizzas if they didn’t want to eat their food.

    My nephew on DH’s side will demand a cream cake to eat at 10pm and his parents give it to him so he has something to eat – that drives me insane.  My nephew from my brother in the meantime eats exactly what the adults eat and thinks everything is “nice”.  SIL said she barely has time to cook as it is – let alone trying to cook 2 or 3 different meals.

    One Table One Dish all the way!

     

    Post # 144
    Member
    2491 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2012

    I don’t have kids, but I can tell you that growing up I was the pickiest eater on the face of the earth. I hated most textures, strong flavours and most seasoning. My options for dinner, (I can remember back to being about 6 or so) was to eat what my family was eating, even if that was eating the chicken and skipping the rest, or to make a balogna sandwich. I ALWAYS had to have one bite of everything before my sandwich and I had to drink 1/2 cup of milk.

    Did it kill me? No. I think the problem became that my mom was so accustomed to tweaking meals slightly for me (No lemon on my lemon chicken, lady!) that she started to cook bland meals. When I went to university I was forced to try new things and I FELL IN LOVE. Now I’m getting fat and happy as I eat anything around me. There isn’t anything I won’t at least try.

    Back to your question, would I cook two seperate meals? Probably not unless there was an allergy or the likes, in which case I probably wouldn’t be eating it. I am a firm believer, however, if there is a second option, it better be something nutritious. Not to say anything bad about mac and cheese, but powdered cheese and noodles is not going to help you grow.

    Post # 145
    Member
    2085 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: June 2012 - Pippin Hill Farm & Vineyards

    My nephew was a picky eater. Well, really, he was just extremely perceptive and used meal time to manipulate my SIL a bit. He refused to eat and he got more time with mama as she tried to coax him into eating.

    I think children don’t have much control in their lives and whatthey put in their mouths can be a way to turn the tables in the benevolent dictatorship of the home. 🙂

    By The Way, there are some baby foods and recipes that are said the widen the palette for babies they use some herbs or spices that aren’t traditionally American. I think it’s kind of a fascinating idea! I have one friend that used them as part of her girls’ diets.

    Post # 146
    Member
    1765 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    They’ll be eating what we eat. The only time I would make something different for them is if we’re eating something not kid friendly. For example, whenever my parents used to have lobster, I had something else. But on a normal night, we’d all be eating the same thing. If there’s something very specific they don’t like, such as aspargus for example, as long as they tried it, I would be okay with making another vegetable side. I would also not force my kids to eat something they really hated. I know my tastes changed as I got older and I love things now that I hated as a kid. But my mom’s parents forced her to eat certain foods when she hated them and she finds those foods so gross as a result that she can’t be near them. 

    Post # 147
    Member
    4108 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: December 2011

    It depends on what we’re eating & the age of our child. If DH & I feel like a nice steak or lobster (which we do often), I’m not wasting money buying extra if it’s just going to go untouched. I also won’t be substituting with crap like boxed mac & cheese, at least not everytime anyway. I’d make a chicken breast or something similar. I plan on introducing my child to all the foods I can & keeping them open to trying new things, especially healthy staples.

    I remember while growing up my mom would literally make me sit at the table until I’d finished all the veggies/meat/whatever on my plate . This sometimes went on for hours. If I didn’t eat it, it was straight to bed for me. I remember a VERY long night at the dinner table when I was about 10- she made chicken liver, onions & mushrooms. Makes me gag thinking about it, I still hate all those things to this day. I won’t be unreasonable when it comes to some things like that- you don’t have to create a meal in which your child literally hates everything on the plate so much that they throw up after eating it. 

    Post # 148
    Member
    5147 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    @Mrs. Mink – Do you have a link to any of those recipes? I plan on using a baby food-mill and grinding up whatever we’re eating, but I know you’re supposed to start off slow when introducing solid food at first, so I’ll probably be making seperate “baby food” first, and then transition to using the food-mill after that.

    Post # 149
    Member
    35 posts
    Newbee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    They will eat what we eat….That being said, I will also give them choices.

    Example, Do you want broccoli or carrots?

    Do you want raw or cooked veggies?

    Elbow or Sprial noodles?

    The list could go on and on.  This will give them a sense of ownership over there food and they will be more likely to eat it.

     

    Post # 150
    Member
    4729 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    I don’t have kids yet, but my parents struck a good balance in my opinion – they wouldn’t cook to order or make us a separate meal, but mom would modify it slightly to make sure we would eat it.  For instance, my sister went through a time when she didn’t like sauce on her pasta – so mom just left the sauce in a different pot and we spooned sauce on if we wanted it. No extra work – just a way to customize it.  Or she cooked peppers and onions separately and added them to her and my father’s meat without adding it to ours. Or she’d leave certain ingredients as large pieces so we could pick them out or eat around them.

    The only meal I truly hated as a kid was meatloaf and green beans, and my parents’ rule was that I had to eat three green beans and three bites of meatloaf.  After that I could be “done,” but I didn’t get something different. When we were older (teens), if we didn’t want what was for dinner, we could make our own (a sandwich, soup, etc.) as long as it was ready it time for us to sit down with everyone else – but she wouldn’t make it for us.

    Hopefully, I’ll be able to strike a similar balance with my kids.

    Post # 151
    Member
    1812 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: February 2012

    For curiosity reasons, I would love if OP could add more options to the poll.

    Child-Free – Will Eat what we eat

    Parent – actively encouraging children to eat the same

    Child-Free – cook seperate meal

    Parent – cook seperate

    Parent – always said I would only cook one meal but turned out different.

    etc…

     

    I am child-free, and I wonder if I’m standing a bit on a soap-box with my views or not.  I hear often from friends who have kids when I say how I’d love to do something (i.e. I want to use terry-towelling nappies). “Ha! You just wait and see!!!  We all say that!”

    The topic ‘Will you make your kids eat what you do, or will you fix them something else?’ is closed to new replies.

    Find Amazing Vendors