(Closed) Working families with Weimaraners?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
623 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

 

Equestrian317:  I think you set yourself up great! When I still lived at home with my parents we got a Weimaraner puppy and we all had similar schedules. We also crate-trained him, and my mom hired a dog walker to come over twice a day to let him out and take him for walks when he was really little, then went down to just one visit per day. My parents take him for a 2 mile walk each night (no walk in the morning, just let him run around outside and go to the bathroom). He is and has been totally fine being in the crate during the day, and I think he actually likes it! He sleeps in the crate at night too and when he gets tired he gets off the couch and goes into his crate without being told. He doesn’t have separation anxiety but maybe we just got lucky, not sure. Anyway, I hope this helps! You have nothing to be nervous about and I think your pup will adjust just fine!

Post # 4
Member
668 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

It sounds like you are already aware that Weimaraners are a very active breed. My neighbor had weimaraners and two out of the three dogs she had were HYPER to the point of being destructive. My neighbor was a stay at home mom, yet very active, which is why they decided on the breed. There was no end for these dogs, even when they were 6 and 7 years old they were still destroying fence posts and swing sets. Each dog has its own personality but just be aware these dogs are naturally very active so be prepared for what you get.

 

good luck!

 

 

 

Post # 6
Member
2863 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I have a Weim, she is my world but so much work. Please be prepared that crating often does not work with this breed. We tried it and she literally tore her mouth open and CHEWED out of the biggest, most heavy duty crate sold in 30 minutes. She can not be locked in any space, period. We tried just letting her have roam of the kitchen/laundry- nope. Her own bedroom- nope. The only place she won’t tear the floor up and doors apart trying to get out of is having roam of the living room. This is extremely common with this breed so be ready to have Plan B,C and D when it comes to your dog because you will likely need it. 

Post # 7
Member
3471 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2012 - The Gables Inn, Santa Rosa, CA

It sounds like you’re on the right track, keep in mind that this time line might make potty training take a bit longer, as they’re more likely to have accidents when they can’t go out every hour or two in the early weeks. But that’s true for any breed. 

Post # 8
Member
1262 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

I have yet to meet a weimar that is successfully crated… Fingers crossed it works well for you! In general they seem to have a fair amount of anxiety when left alone which leads to distruction of their crate, home, yard, etc. I would definitely recommend checking in often and having a backup plan to the crate. 

Post # 9
Member
24 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2016

My Weim was a big ball of love, but he was destructive when left alone longer than a few hours. We would walk/jog him 1-2 miles every morning, and then we would do it again every single evening. He never tired. 

He was as loyal as they come though. 

Post # 10
Member
1308 posts
Bumble bee

Our weim calmed down around 5 years old and when we got a second dog.

Definitely a working breed.  We got through it, just had some torn pillows/blankets and couches along the way.  I wouldn’t freak out about it, but just be prepared for more “puppy chewing” than normal.  

Be consistent with exercise and discipline (get him/her in training EARLY, physical and mental stimulation are a must for this breed) and you will probably be OK.

I would recommend looking into gates that are 4 ft + to prop up around your home that you want him to stay off.  I use this for my smaller dog, but it’s pretty sturdy.  

Learn how to make apple bitter spray.  You can find it on google.  It makes your house smell funny for a few hours, but it definitely stopped my dog from chewing my furniture and her bed.

Good luck, weims are beautiful/loyal dogs.

If the dog is going to be alone a lot during the day after house training, I would advise against having someone with him full time (like your parents), getting him used to that and then suddenly having him alone for the day.  My dog actually acted out when my Fiance was between jobs for 3 weeks (he was home with her ALL day entertaining her), so when we left her home alone she chewed up the couch for the FIRST TIME EVER.  She had a hard time for a bit and was destructive (we now have a huge crated area for her to walk around in, but she is away from any furniture.  Just in there with her blankie and toys), so I imagine a larger dog like a weim will cause way more damage.

Don’t be afraid, just be a consistent loving owner.  You’ll be fine.  You’re also smart not getting a weim as your first dog…

Post # 11
Member
437 posts
Helper bee

We have a vizsla, which is a very energetic and needy dog. We raised him from a puppy. Both of us were working, but thankfully our schedules were opposite of each other. That helped so much. He was never alone for more then an hour. My husband would get ready to go to work, put him in his crate, say “see ya later,” and within an hour I would be home and vice versa.

He crate trained very easy. A lot of people make mistakes with larger dogs by getting them the L or XL crate and not using the divider to allocate the space they can use. If he has too much room he can poop in the back and sleep in the front. We also never used it as a form of punishment. We usually gave him a Kong when we left. We always said “see ya later” and tried to make it positive. I remember the first time we “tested” him. We went on a short trip to the store and left to door open. We came back to a perfectly happy puppy still sitting in his crate. He was a really good and never dug or ruined anything, so we now allow him to roam the house. He still uses his crate to sleep in sometimes.

Potty training wise… there are statistics out there that says how often he will need to pee for every week and month of age and we found them to be fairly accurate. We were getting up every hour throughout the night to take him out to pee. You will probably need somebody to watch him full time while you are gone until he is a few months of age. We have a doggie door, so he now goes out on his own.

The biggest thing is exercise. A lot of people with energetic and needy breeds whine that their dogs dig and do bad doggie things, but they never exercise their dog. A walk is not good enough for our dog. He needs at least a 30 minute run. After a 30 minute run, he takes a quick nap, and is ready to play again. We are fairly active, so it’s never been an issue. We wanted a dog that would run, hike, and camp with us and we got just that.

Post # 12
Member
1362 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I have wanted a weim for a very long time.  I have a very active dog now, who I love but she has been a lot of work and a rescue – she has come such a long way and I am so proud of her!!!  Can you guys answer some questions about the weims?  I also have  a bulldog who I do not enjoy – he sheds a lot and the fur gets stuck and you have to pick it out, he also smells and his slobber is white and stains everything!  I have never owned a short hair dog before and just wondering if its the short hair or the breed???  How is the fur shedding for the weim?  I dont mind shedding, its the not being able to clean it that drives me nuts.  I actually sent my Fiance the vizsla last night as he thinks a weim may be too big so I was thinking that could be a compromise.

Post # 13
Member
1042 posts
Bumble bee

Kat14:  why would you want another hyper dog, when you still have one that needs training and a other one “you dont like”?. 

Weimers shed and it is short hair that gets stuck in everything, much like your bulldog. 

Post # 14
Member
437 posts
Helper bee

Kat14:  If you don’t like working hard with a dog a vizsla is not for you. They are very needy and require extreme amounts of exercise. We are active, but he outdoes me everytime. They are stubborn and need somebody who will keep them in line. And ours actually sheds a lot. We have a vizsla and a short haired cat and the amount of fur I vacuum up (most of which is copper colored) is gross. Ours is to standards, but a lot of vizslas can and do get just as big as a weim., so don’t count on the size.

Unless you are considering a vizsla because you want somebody who can run fast and long, go hiking, skiing, and camping with you… then you should look at other dogs. They are hard work and you will pay dearly if you can’t keep them happy. I have seen many beautiful vizslas ruined because their human companions failed them.

  • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by  UnderTheSun14.
Post # 15
Member
1362 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

We wont be getting another dog until one of these passes.  I never said she needs more training – I said she has been a lot of work.  If it sounded like the a lot of work was negative it wasnt – I have worked hard with her and it has paid off.  She is like a brand new dog compared to when I got her.  She would love another dog who would run and play with her and I would love another dog who can go on our walks and adventures with us.  I would like to hear from some other people who have weims as well so if anyone is out there it would be appreciated!

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