(Closed) Would you expect an educated person to know…

posted 7 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 152
Member
4304 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

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@cece_intheuk:  You’re right. I’m scared for humanity.

Post # 153
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804 posts
Busy bee

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@deetroitwhat:  Sure, trivialise it if you want. If you cannot/refuse to see the point that I’m trying to make i.e. people should be aware of significant events in human history, without finding it laughable then that’s sad. One of my parents left a country where the leader was eventually convicted and sentenced to death for mass murder but hey, who cares right?

Post # 154
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4304 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

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@cece_intheuk:  I’m not trivializing anything and I’m not laughing. Absolutely not the point I am making at all. You’re being dramatic and oversimplifying how people come to know information. That’s all.

And I would bet my 401k that you could not list every travesty in every country since the beginning of time. Educated or not. Because no one can and that’s certainly not a fault of being ignorant. It’s called being human.

Post # 155
Member
845 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2014

@peachacid:  I’d expect people to know what apartheid is educated or not, but then again I am SOUTH AFRICAN 🙂 Perhaps we assume everyone knows.

 

I think there are loads of details that even educated people don’t know because lack of interest saw them glossing over it in school.

It’s a little shameful that a teacher doesn’t know though.

Post # 156
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9124 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013 - Rocky Mountains USA

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@katrinamlee:  where are you from?  I’m from Wyoming too!  We might be the only two on here, lol.  I’m from Lander 🙂

And I definitely didn’t learn about apartheid in high school, but I’m a big reader and read about it.

Post # 157
Member
804 posts
Busy bee

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@deetroitwhat:  I interpreted the ‘LOL’ as laughing and the “I’m scared for humanity” as sarcastic. Should I have interpreted them some other way?

I’m not sure what you mean by saying that I’m “oversimplifying how people come to know information”. Any knowledge I have comes from either being taught about it, hearing on the news, or looking it up on the internet out of interest. As far as I’m aware, these are all pretty standard ways of accessing information.

I’m certainly not being dramatic – if you read about apartheid I think you’ll find that describing it as “horrific, brutal and devastating” isn’t exactly blowing it out of proportion.

I absolutely don’t know about everything about “every travesty in every country since the beginning of time” (a fairly dramatic expression I’d say…). I wouldn’t be surprised or shocked if people didn’t know about the problems in the county that my parent left. However, apartheid was such big deal in the not-too-distant past, and is still referenced today reguarly enough that I expected people to have a general awareness of it. To me it’s like having not heard of the Holocaust, which would be pretty ignorant.

Post # 158
Member
10357 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

There are people who still believe that evolution doesn’t exist and that Obama wasn’t born in the USA.

Soooo…..no, this doesn’t surprise me. Saddens me, but doesn’t surprise me.

Post # 159
Member
11736 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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@cece_intheuk:  Knowledge of mass murder does not mean it won’t occur. I’m quite certain that people who conduct such acts are in fact aware of other similar acts that have occured in the past and clearly it did not stop them.  People don’t need to know what apartheid was to know that such things are wrong.

Post # 160
Member
3256 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

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@BlondeMissMolly:  I would use it as an opportunity to teach, yes, as my parents did.

Post # 161
Member
2703 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@MrsWBS: OP your tone comes off as very judgemental and sanctimonious.  I recall you posting about help on a pretty basic math question recently.  Someone could have replied saying I would expect a teacher or a tutor to know basic algebra, but they didn’t.  Instead they chose to help answer your question.

 

+100  I tried to hint to this in an earlier comment, but it just got lost in the mix.

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@peachacid:  And teachers get all offended when people say they’re not the sharpest bulbs on the bush…

I think this is what people are resonding to.  You basically imply that those who do not know what apartheid is are stupid.  Even though you claim it’s not about judging others, this statement is pretty judgey.  It’s also a bit hypocritical coming from someone who needed help with basic math concepts – concepts I feel should be common knowledge for an educated person.  People didn’t judge you, they tried to help. 

 

It would have been on thing to say “I thought apartheid or knowing about the segregation in South Africa was common knoweldge, but perhaps it isn’t?  What do you think?”  But you didn’t.

 

 

 

Post # 162
Member
301 posts
Helper bee

I consider myself very intelligent and educated, and I only knew a little bit about it. My high school world history course got behind schedule and we stopped at WWII. My college history course was on western civilization and US History. Being an American makes a big difference. It seems like we only learn the history of our own country. My parents are not intellectual at all so there was no one to teach me about, and I was never that interested in the subject in school – I am a biologist and was a big science nerd. 

I bet a lot of people think that apartheid is over, and while legally it is, the reality is quite different. I was in South Africa last summer and the country is still incredibly segregated physically, in class and culture.

Post # 163
Member
2214 posts
Buzzing bee

I would absolutely expect someone to know this! Unfortunately, it doesn’t shock me that people don’t know though. People’s ignorance of world events baffles me daily. You don’t have to know every detail about apartheid, but if someone says “apartheid,” I think it should at least ring a bell for all educated people. This is almost akin to not knowing what the Holocaust is.

Post # 164
Member
4474 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

While I would expect an educated person to know that, I wouldn’t hold it against them if they didn’t know…but a TEACHER?!   Who has young minds in their hands?  That’s downright frightening.

 

Post # 165
Member
5398 posts
Bee Keeper

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@Duncan:  ok, when YOU have a 5-6 year old, let me know how it goes teaching them about apartheid. Remember, if I was 5-6, you would have been 13-14 based on the age you gave. Of course it would be more appropriate to teach a teenager about apartheid than a 5-6 year old in kindergarten/1st grade. 

Post # 166
Member
495 posts
Helper bee

Yes, I would be somewhat surprised if an intelligent, educated and up-on-current-events person did not know what apartheid was.

 

I think not knowing comes from not being too curious about things you don’t “have” to know (like for a test) or “want” to know. Some things are vital even if they’re not part of schools’ curriculum.

That said, we watched documentaries and fictionalized films about apartheid and read about it in our history books in high school, for sure.

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