(Closed) Would you pay $500 for these rescue pups?

posted 8 years ago in Pets
Post # 17
Member
2606 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

View original reply
@countrygirl62312:  I’d love to get another dog, but worry my current pup might be jealous, you eliminate that by getting them together! 

We got two dogs as puppies at the same time, and I actually wouldn’t do it again.  Siblings can still have jealousy issues, and they often tend to bond more closely to each other than to their owners.  Definitely what we experienced with our previous pair. Not that they didn’t love us!  But it was more difficult to do anything with them seperately.  Once one of them passed away, the other became more affectionate and more willing to play and train…it was almost like having a different dog.

OP, if you decide to get two at the same time, make sure that you do things with them both together AND seperately from the time they are young.  Seperate obedience classes might be a good idea, too.  I remember when we took our current dog, the class in the next ring had a pair of siblings that were really struggling in the class because they were so focused on what the other one was doing they had a hard time paying attention to what they should have been doing.  

Thats a lot for rescues. But I would pay that to a breeder.

Because resonsible breeders don’t breed mixes, I certainly wouldn’t pay that to a breeder!  If, however, they were registered, and from titled parents, (“champion bloodlines” means very little) who were also health tested, and the puppies came with a health guarantee and a lifetime return contract, (as in, if for any reason I can no longer care for the dog properly, the breeder will take it back and/or help me place the dog), I would pay that and more.

Post # 18
Member
3218 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

Sounds like a backyard breeder to me– I wouldn’t support them.

Post # 19
Member
1660 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

View original reply
@galloway111: That is not the case where I live in MD. In almost all cases, shelters and rescues charge more for puppies than older dogs.

View original reply
@MsYellowJacket: If spaying/neutering is included, along with early vetting, I don’t think that’s terrible.  Where I live, most puppies on petfinder have $250 – $400 adoption fees. My small mix breed dog (adopted @ 7-8 months) had a $275 adoption fee. $500 does seem high – though not ridiculously though. I imagine they are using money from the more adoptable pets to pay for the less adoptable ones, and I actually don’t think that’s so terrible. I do believe the bottle feeding also could justify the price, since the milk/formula is likely expensive… but I would really make sure you trust the rescue.

ETA: These are the adoption fees at the shelter (Humane Society) where I volunteer:

Adoption Fees

Puppies & Purebreds: $ 250.00

Dogs 1-5 years: $ 160.00

Dogs 6 or older: $ 95.00

Includes: First set of Distemper, Rabies Vaccination (4+months), De-wormer, Flea/Tick Preventative, Microchip, and General Exam

They do not spay/neuter before allowing pets to be adopted (which I don’t quite agree with) but they require it and make people pay a deposit for the surgery… 

 

Post # 20
Member
3218 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

View original reply
@Miss Apricot: And I totally agree with everything you’ve said. 

Really want to reiterate– I wouldn’t get two puppies at the same time, but if you do, be sure train them separately. And that reputable breeders don’t breed mixes. 

I’d pay more than $1000 for a reputably breed dog from a breeder who does health and temperament testing, shows their dogs, only breeds one type of dog, and is top-of-the-line for their particular breed. (And I’ve worked in animal rescue and shelters for years.) I wouldn’t pay more than $250-$300 for a rescue dog– and I’d only go that much if it was a breed-specific rescue and they transported and worked out of foster homes, or if the animal had a ton of medical problems such as previous surgeries that they needed more money to offset the costs. 

Post # 21
Member
1012 posts
Bumble bee

$500 is not ridiculous for a cross bread of that kind. 

Also, the amount of work that went into bottle feeding them….i just cant imagine. 

Definitely get them. 

Post # 22
Member
3980 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I have a Snorkie!!!! And they are the most amazing dogs ever. When we adopt another dog, we are looking for another Snorkie. That being said, we paid $250 to rescue her and we didn’t get anything included like a lot of rescues do. WE realized a little too late that we had purchased from a Puppy Mill that specializes in “designer breeds”. That is NOT the going rate for the mix. There is no going rate really. I can guarentee you I can find you a Schnauzer mix (even a snorkie) on Petfinder or Craigslist that isn’t from somebody just trying to make a buck which is definately how that sounds. $500 is WAY too much to pay for a mutt! Which, as much as I love my adorable “designer mix” Snorkie, that is what she is. Don’t do it. It sounds like another puppy mill. Any reputible rescue would never make you pay that much even if the had to feed them off their own breast!

 

 

And just because Snorkies are too cute not to show off. Here is my baby!

 

 

I really recommend the mix but I hope you will consider looking elsewhere. There are much cheaper dogs with the same breedlines who need adopting.

Post # 23
Member
319 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

Reputable breed rescues (not a humane society that takes all comers) often charge quite a bit for young dogs because they end up caring for older/infirm dogs for their entire lives.

Check out the rescue for sure, but our bulldog was $700 from a rescue because he was in good health and was young (although bulldog pups can go for 1,000-3,000 from a breeder). Rescues often end up with the weighty responsibility of caring for dogs with severe medical problems because they generally do not euthanize (again, depending on the rescue).

In our case a large portion of our adoption fee was a tax deductible donation. So that’s worth thinking about as well.

Post # 24
Member
3218 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

I found the rescue on Petfinder– it looks to be a real rescue (though not breed-specific), just one run entirely on volunteers and who must not have the best set-up because of location, management, or luck.  I don’t think they’re scamming you but I still don’t think I’d be willing to pay that much from them. 

Post # 26
Member
602 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

My comlete mutt of a rescue dog was $375.  She wasn’t a puppy–which typically goes for more.  The higher adoption fee goes to support the rescue which is run entirely by a network of volunteers / pays for dogs medical treatment.  I have several friends that work for the rescue so I know that all of the money goes back to dogs vs.  turning a profit.  I don’t think $500 is unreasonable.

Post # 27
Member
13094 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

View original reply
@abbyful: I agree.  We paid $200 for our shelter mix.  I’ve never heard of a shelter charging $500 for a mutt, no matter what is included in the fee.  (And yes – a schnauzer/yorkie mix is a mutt).

The fact that they used the phrase “that’s the going rate for schnauzer/yorkie mixes” is very fishy too.  I’ve never seen a shelter charge different amounts for different breeds.  Higher prices for puppies vs older dogs, yes.  But never breed specific.  And especially not when the breed is a “designer” mutt.

Post # 28
Member
438 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

hmmmm…. at the end of the day, they’re rescues.  A rescue group, to me, rescues animals in hopes that they will find a better home.  They’re not necessarily in it for the money, other than to recoup their costs that they spent on the animal. 

I have two rescue dogs and one of them is a pure bred.  Even with that, I only paid $200 for the pure bred, due to all of the medical issues he had that the rescue group had to pay up front. 

From what it sounds like here, they’re trying to make a lot more of a profit.  And I’m sorry, but I don’t care what cute name they have for a mixed breed dog (puggle, snorkie, labradoodle, etc.), it’s just that, a mixed breed.  I would never pay $500 for a mixed breed dog, but that’s just me. 

Post # 29
Member
2783 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

We paid $350 for our puppy when we got him, and he was just under a year old. I would def recommend looking at the rate in your area, as it seems just from previous posts that it can be a regional thing.

I totally don’t mean this to sound snarky at all, and I’m sorry if it comes off that way, but if Fiance is nervous about the cost of the puppies, just make sure that he knows that having a dog can be VERY pricey. We easily spent well over 1k in our first year with our rescue because of vet bills, trainers, and pet sitters for his separation anxiety. That’s not to mention the stuff he destroyed because he was a puppy, and we didn’t know enough to hide stuff from him. We agree now it was some of the best money we ever spent, but we NEVER thought it would cost that much.

Post # 30
Member
319 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

Just as a point of clarification, there is a difference between a “shelter” and a “rescue”. Shelters generally take in as many homeless dogs as they can and try to turn them around quickly. They will usually (though not always) euthanize dogs that are either infirm or who stay “too long” (though this is often not a defined amount of time).

Breed specific (or mix specific) rescues are dedicated to their breed and are less of a “shelter” and more of a network of foster homes that care for a handful of dogs in a “home” setting, where they interact with people and other pets and usually live side-by-side with the foster-owners’ own pets (though some shelters have foster homes they are usually only for the sickest dogs or new puppies). They often don’t euthanize until the very end of a dog’s life meaning foster-owners (volunteers) are often taking considerable time and expense to care for dogs that need surgery or are recovering from surgery, diabetic dogs that need shots or epileptic dogs that need medication and constant monitoring.

The rescue we got our bulldog from currently has a dog that came in extremely malnourished, with mange, and several bulldog specific maladies (he needed surgery on his eyes and palate). The care for this dog will be in the several thousands and will be taken on entirely by the organization. If he were in a “shelter” he would likely be euthanized because the care is so expensive. That isn’t a judgment on shelters, many are wonderful, but it’s part of the reason that reason that rescues can have much higher adoption fees than your local humane society or pound.

 Of course buyer beware, you should definitely look in to any rescue and make sure they are legitimate (they should be a 501(c)3 and you should be able to view their IRS filings and find out how much of their fees go to “overhead” rather than “services”) but it is not shady that a rescue organization would charge what might be perceived as “very high” adoption fees.

Post # 31
Member
13094 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

View original reply
@sara_tiara: “I would def recommend looking at the rate in your area, as it seems just from previous posts that it can be a regional thing.”

I just googled because I was curious (and bored at work), and that definitely doesn’t seem to be a “going rate” for adoptions in the Atlanta area.

The most expensive adoption fee I can find at the Atlanta Humane Society is $150 (for puppies).  Older dogs are all $100.  Another shelter, PAWS Atlanta, charges $225 for puppies under 6 months and $175 for older dogs.  Atlanta Pet Rescue charges $275 for most dogs and $325 – $425 for some purebreds (which the OPs puppies are not).

View original reply
@Lexy: I agree that many times the rescues put a lot more money and time into the animals and any care they might need.  That said, our dog came from a no-kill rescue and still only had a $200 adoption fee.

 

The topic ‘Would you pay $500 for these rescue pups?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors