(Closed) Would You Think This is Weird?

posted 7 years ago in Interfaith
Post # 3
Member
375 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I don’t think so. I assume that with an interfaith wedding not performed by a clerical figure, it’s not in a house of worship of any particular denomination. In which case, I don’t know that too many guests will spend much time thinking about the faith of your officiant.

Post # 5
Member
345 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I don’t think that’s weird at all.  It should be whatever you want it to be, and can include any religious elements you want to have – but I am wondering will guests have a choice in whether their wear them or not?  Some people may choose not to, or may not know enough about it (I certainly don’t!) to know what exactly it represents so may feel a little awkward if they just walk in and it gets handed to them. So you may just want to explain/make it clear just in case someone gets offended or whatever, cause you know how politically correct some people can be nowadays!!

Post # 7
Member
375 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

That’s a good point. I’d make it optional (like in a basket with a sign) and obvious that it’s open to anyone who wants to participate. With religious stuff a lot of people don’t want to accidentally offend by partaking in something they aren’t supposed to unless they are a member of the congregation (like Catholic communion).

Post # 8
Member
937 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

No, I don’t think it’s weird. We had an interfaith ceremony (we weren’t married by a Rabbi, we had the Cantor from the synagogue) and we provided kippot. We just put the kippot in a decorative basket with a sign that read: “The Kippah (yarmulke) is the traditional Jewish head covering. Regardless of whether you are Jewish, you may wear one if you are comfortable doing so.”

Post # 9
Member
48 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2008

I’m Jewish and my husband is not, but my Rabbi did marry us (we didn’t get married in the Temple, though). Anyways, we just provided really pretty yarmulkes for all the groomsmen and our dads. That way, there was no question of my hubby’s family and our non-Jewish friends potentially being uncomfortable. It also saved money from purchasing 100 of them and we could go with prettier ones for those that did wear them. 

Post # 10
Member
1 posts
Wannabee

A couple I recently photographed had a basket of yarmulkes by the entrance with a handwritten card inviting their guests to wear one if they preferred.  It really was a lovely gesture & many of the guests were happy to don one.

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