(Closed) Would you vaccinated your kids?

posted 7 years ago in Parenting
Post # 122
Member
10649 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@li612:  So you think it’s better for some who knows they are allergic to a component of a vaccine to receive it and risk dying from an allergic reaction than it is to risk the smaller chance they will get the disease?

Post # 123
Member
887 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@AB Bride:  Do you even understand the concept of herd immunity? The EXACT reason that I get so mad about people not vaccinating “because of their bizarre, misguided belief system” is because people who cannot vaccinate: you, others with intolerances to vaccines, young babies, people too weak or ill to be vaccinated, deserve to benefit from herd immunity. Herd immunity is a moot point for people who have been effectively vaccinated, because they are IMMUNE to these diseases because they have been vaccinated. It is only even a factor for people who cannot be vaccinated, like you. So the very fact that I brought up the concept of herd immunity at all negates your entire point about whatever the hell in my post offended you. I’m sorry that this is such a touchy subject for you, clearly this is something that has bothered you for a while and you feel the need to get your back up at the very mention of vaccines, but that doesn’t give you the right to misinterpret a bunch of people’s posts and get all needlessly offended that we are all not wording our posts to be hypersensitive to your specific situation. The negative comments about not vaccinating are directed at people who don’t vaccinate by choice. Not people who don’t vaccinate because they don’t have the option to. I seriously don’t understand how you could be offended by any of this. You and people like you are the very people who are most at risk from anti-vaxers, and the risks posed to you and people like you are the precise reason why this stuff makes us so angry. What part of “your bizarre and misguided belief system” did you think that I ascribed to your inherent, physiological intolerance to vaccines? In what way did you assume that I think that it was your ‘terrible choice’ to be intoleranrt to vaccines? I think you are just looking for something to be offended about.

Post # 124
Member
1837 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@AB Bride:  haha, no. that is the only reason that makes sense.

Post # 125
Member
5004 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2018

I’ll definitely be vaccinating my kids, at least to all the major things like polio, meningitis, etc (the required ones). I’m still undecided on things like chicken pox and the Gardasil shot (neither of which I’ve had), so I’ll do my research about it all when the time comes. 

Post # 126
Member
831 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: Either Philadelphia City Hall or a small chapel.

I’d vaccinate. I am the oldest of 3 girls all who were vaccinated regularly as doctor recommended.Including for HPV.

We’re all healthy and have never been seriously/gravely ill. Things as simple as the chicken pox can turn deadly for a perfectly normal kid. Is that worth it?

Post # 127
Member
816 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I’m not sure but can’t you get a far worse version of chicken pox as an adult if you aren’t properly immunized?  And by that I’m including being exposed to it as a kid.  Sorry not to familiar with all the phases/complications involved with chicken pox.

 

As for HPV, speaking as someone who had severe reactions to the vaccine, I do believe that all kids not only girls should get it.  If I knew that I would get a severe reaction I would still take this vaccine, but I would of course see with my doctor how to minimize the risk/severity of the reaction. I believe that Gardasil is nowavailable to boys (which makes a lot of sense) but I”m not sure.  My personal experience comes from the fact that my father ended up having an affair with someone who had HPV and put my mom unknowingly at risk.  I believe everyone should be able to be proactive in their healths (not depend on the other spouse) especially with a disease that can cause cancer.  MHO.

Post # 128
Member
5147 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

We are vaccinating. We are just spacing it out so he doesn’t get EVERYTHING at once (splitting the shots up into 2 visits a few weeks apart). We skipped Hep-B at birth, started that series with his 2-month shots. Our pediatrician uses preservative-free, single vial vaccines.

A couple months ago, my son, then 3 months old, was sick and tested for pertussis. (Thankfully it came back negative.) But when the doctors said that he might have it, I was angry! I work at a children’s hospital, so I hear a lot about how outbreaks are on the rise because people won’t want to vaccinate, I was mad that these people not vaccinating may have given my baby that was too young to be fully vaccinated a potentially life-threatening illness!

 

 

@CherryWaves – RE: “I can’t even count how many jobs/careers they will never be able to establish just because they aren’t vaccinated…”

They should still be able to get any job provided they catch up on their vaccines. I work at a children’s hospital, I had to provide my vaccine records, they did titers for records I didn’t have or to check immunity for diseases I had in the past (ex: my blood test showed I had chickenpox in the past, so I didn’t have to get varicella vaccine), and anything I didn’t have up-to-date they gave me. I had to get TDaP, flu (yearly), and optional but I got it was Hep A.

Post # 129
Member
10649 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@araneidae: I appreciate that you did clarify your comments more.  You did say “Anybody who doesn’t vaccinate their kids should have to go and live in an anti-vaccine commune together, and stay the hell away from the rest of us.”  Just because someone has been vaccinated, it doesn’t mean they are immune to a disease.  A vaccine is not 100% effective, and it’s effect ranges from one person to another.  There are people who do believe only those who got vaccinated or who will be vaccinated (like babies) deserve to be protected by herd immunity.  Based on your comments, I couldn’t tell if you were in that group or not.  I’ve dealt with one of those people who refused to process the paperwork for me in a medical setting.  When people make blanket statements, it just verifies the opinions of that group.

Safety issues also come up, as people start to assume vaccines are safe for everyone.  People giving vaccines at clinics become complacent.  When my over-reactions were just soreness beyond what most people got and vomitting, I still figured the flu vaccine was worth it.  I would check off the little box for reacted to vaccine in the past just to be careful though.  Nurses would glance at the card and assume I had checked off the same as everyone else.  I wouldn’t be surprised if they did the same to those with egg allergies.  I’ve been told to leave without waiting first to see if I do react.  Blanket statements just encourage these types of attitudes.

Post # 130
Member
847 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2015

@mrshoneybee:  YES. It is the height of selfishness not to vaccinate your kids. If some people don’t get vaccinated then it doesn’t really work because they can still contract infectious diseases and  spread then to others who have been vaccinated. Also, if you’re getting free shots against things like cervical cancer, polio and meningitis then you would be stupid to say no. Maybe in the past there was a lot of misinformation but nowadays there’s no excuse for not getting vaccinated. It annoys me to think that some people would endanger the lives of others by risking spreading horrible illnesses just because they don’t want to have a jag. That’s pathetic. 

Unless you’re allergic to the drugs in the vaccines or something. 

Post # 131
Member
10649 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

Lumping people who have a medical reasons to not be vaccinated in with the anti-vaxers also helps to promote their agenda.  They start to claim good scientific research as supporting their claims, along with doctors’ comments.  They would likely do this anyone, but when people lump those two groups together it gives them more credibility.

Good science may show that certain things are good for a population, and even almost all of the individuals of that population.  It would be rare for good science to show that one treatment is best for all individuals.  When talking about vaccines, it helps to use good science as there is so much pseudoscience floating around about them already.  Using terms such as anyone, and everyone usually do not help.

Post # 132
Member
2424 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I’ve posted rants on this before (and in fact am copying most of this from my replies on previous threads), but I am pro-vaccine, no questions asked. They are much better for you than the antibiotics and anti-virals you have to take if you contract these diseases. Vaccines have saved millions of lives, and it saddens me that in some ways society is trying to move BACKWARDS and not take advantage of the huge advantages science has made.

I have gotten every vaccine I can (flu shots, HPV, etc), and will get my children every vaccine available. I take no risks.

Also, this article below sums up how I feel about vaccinations. We are in a society where choosing not to vaccinate children is essentially a “first world/rich people problem” because if you live in a first world country where most of the population is vaccinated and it’s a clean/modernized area, the herd immunity protects your child. Then people think “Well we didn’t vaccinate and my child is fine” Well OF COURSE, because the rest of the responsible people are keeping your kid safe, not YOU! Just wait until your kid goes to college and comes into contact with something severly life threatening like meningitus. When I went to college, you had to get the vaccine to live in the dorm, but a neighboring college (an Ivy League school) didn’t require it and 3 students died of meningitus while I was in college. My school had none.

http://www.rhrealitycheck.org/article/2012/01/03/vaccinating-children-against-diseases-including-hpv-is-one-our-societal-responsib

Post # 133
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

I was vaccinated and I have vaccinated my daughter to date. I’m very glad I did as when she was 5 months we had an outbreak of whooping cough in our county and I know 4 mothers who hadn’t vaccinated their babies. All of them got awfully sick and one nearly died. I would also feel terrible if I hadn’t immunised my child and she passed on something to another baby. I went to school with a girl whose parents didn’t believe in vaccinations and she had measles, mumps and rubella in the space of 18 months and missed most of that time in school during an exam year. I think the benefits of vaccinations outweigh the possible problems with it. 

 

Saying that, I work for a company that looks after the intellectually disabled. A woman in our care was perfectly healthy until she had a vaccine when she was five. It triggered seizures and damaged her brain. She is now forty, frail, unable to walk or talk and he only way to communicate is with squeals. However this was 30 odd years ago and I am hoping that modern medicine has improved since then. 

Post # 134
Member
232 posts
Helper bee

I have vaccinated my daughter so far. We look into each one, but so far we’ve found that it is better to vaccinate than not to. Our pediatrician spaces them out as far apart as he can for our own peace of mind, and we just finished her up to 18 months shots.

My mom has been making somewhat paranoid comments lately that have been sort of discouraging, as she believes that her brother’s autism was a result of ~18 month shots (yet she vaccinated all of her children, so why the judgment toward my decision to vaccinate, I have no idea).

But I think we’re making the right choice for our daughter’s safety. 🙂

Post # 135
Member
436 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

Absolutely. I’m a farm gal, so I grew up realizing that just about everything needed to be vaccinated for it to be as healthy as possible. As one of the previous posters said, NOT vaccinating has far worse repercussions, than choosing to vaccinate.  

Post # 136
Member
1810 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

Yes…yes…YES!!!

 

I mean, *ahem* yes I will be vaccinating my children.

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